CEBC-Sponsored Webinars

2017

Implementation of California’s Continuum of Care Reform: Using the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse to Identify & Support New Core Service Programs - June 2017


    The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, June 21, 2017 from 10:00-11:00am PST. The webinar is 1 hour long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    California’s continuum of care reform (CCR) is a comprehensive effort to improve and expand placement and treatment options for children and youth in the foster care system. As CCR implementation efforts move forward, county systems and agencies need to be aware of currently available empirically-supported practices that can effectively serve children, youth, and families. The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse (CEBC www.cebc4cw.org) provides children and youth serving agencies with detailed information on a diverse range of programs, including many programs that can be utilized to support CCR core services. This 60-minute webinar provides system leaders and decision-makers with practical information for identifying new CCR core service programs and strategies/resources for effectively implementing these programs.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to do the following:

    • Effectively utilize the CEBC website to identify and access information on relevant programs for addressing CCR core services, including trauma-informed care, home-based family care, outpatient and residential therapeutic programs, and child & family teaming approaches.
    • Access additional tools and resources for implementing evidence-based practices that address CCR core services.
    • Identify best practices and strategies for cross-system collaboration between child welfare and behavioral health systems.

    The CEBC resource, Using the CEBC to Identify & Support California’s Continuum of Care Reform, that summarizes some of this information can be accessed here.

    Jared Martin is the Implementation and Training Specialist with the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego. Jared’s primary role is to support the CEBC’s work on promoting guidance and resources on the implementation of evidence-based practices, which includes conducting trainings and webinars on implementation topics, providing technical assistance, and keeping the CEBC selection & implementation website up-to-date with research and new content.

Leadership and Organizational Change for Implementation - March 2017


    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday March 23, 2017 from 10:00-11:00am PT. The webinar is 1 hour long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    Please click the links below to access any of the webinar-relevant handouts:

    The Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS): development of a brief measure of unit level implementation leadership

    Leadership and organizational change for implementation (LOCI): a randomized mixed method pilot study of a leadership and organization development intervention for evidence-based practice implementation

    The Role of Leadership in Creating a Strategic Climate for Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Sustainment in Systems and Organizations

    Testing the leadership and organizational change for implementation (LOCI) intervention in substance abuse treatment: a cluster randomized trial study protocol

    Cross-Validation of the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS) in Child Welfare Service Organizations

    This webinar describes recent work on leadership for implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in child welfare and other service settings. Issues in implementing these EBPs in systems and organizations are discussed. The webinar considers the roles of contracting and collaboration on implementation and sustainment.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to do the following:

    • Describe the full range leadership model
    • Describe implementation leadership
    • Identify brief measures to assess leadership and climate for evidence-based practice implementation
    • Describe how system and organizational leadership are related to evidence-based practice sustainment

    Greg Aarons, PhD, is a clinical and organizational psychologist, Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), a faculty member in the UCSD/SDSU Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, and Director of the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC). Dr. Aarons' research has been funded by the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the Centers for Disease Control. His research has developed implementation conceptual frameworks (e.g., the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment Framework), measures of individual and organizational factors that influence implementation (e.g., Evidence-Based Practice Attitudes Scale, Implementation Climate Scale), and developed and tested implementation strategies (e.g., the Leadership and Organizational Change Intervention). Dr. Aarons most current work focuses on improving organizational context and training managers and supervisors to become effective leaders, to create a positive implementation climate, and to successfully lead evidence-based practice implementation in their teams and organizations.

Sustainment of Prevention Programs and Initiatives - February 2017


    The webinar was originally recorded on Tuesday February 28, 2017 from 10:15 am to 11:00 am (PT). The webinar is 45 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    Sustainment of evidence-based practices and programs in public youth-serving systems is one of the greatest, yet least understood challenges of implementation science. A large knowledge gap exists regarding the meaning of the term “sustainment” and what factors predict or even measure sustainment of effective prevention programs and support systems. In this presentation, Dr. Palinkas reviews some of the current barriers to sustaining evidence-based programs in child welfare and child mental health, describes potential strategies for achieving long-term sustainment, and presents findings from an ongoing study to develop a system for measuring and monitoring progress toward sustainment.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Identify 3-5 major barriers to sustaining evidence-based practices and programs in child welfare and child mental health.
    • Identify 3-5 strategies for overcoming these barriers to achieve successful long-term sustainment.
    • Identify 9 key constructs for measuring and monitoring progress toward sustainment.

    Lawrence A. Palinkas, PhD, is the Albert G. and Frances Lomas Feldman Professor of Social Policy and Health and chair of the Department of Children, Youth and Families at the University of Southern California. He also holds secondary appointments as professor in the departments of anthropology and preventive medicine at USC. A medical anthropologist, he is an expert in the areas of preventive medicine, cross-cultural medicine and health services research. His current research encompasses implementation of child and adolescent mental health services, sustainment of prevention programs and initiatives, and effects of climate change on vulnerable populations. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, NASA, National Institutes of Health, the MacArthur Foundation, and the William T. Grant Foundation. He is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare, American Anthropological Association and Society for Applied Anthropology. He is the author of more than 360 publications.

2016

Evidence-Based Practices Supporting Youth in their Transition into Adulthood - June 2016


    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, June 30th, from 10:00 to 11:30 am (PDT). It is 1 hour and 29 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Mark Courtney, PhD, and Jared Martin, MA, explore how emerging adulthood presents many barriers and challenges for young people, especially for those who are preparing to exit the foster care system. They discuss how programs that aid young peoples’ transition to adulthood have a limited, but growing, evidence base. The goal of this 90-minute webinar is to inform service providers about the current state of the evidence among programs serving transition age youth and to highlight the California Evidence-Base Clearinghouse (CEBC) as a critical tool for identifying, selecting, and implementing these programs.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • The current limitations and future directions to building an evidence base among programs that effectively aid and support youth in their transition into adulthood.
    • Currently available programs for transition age youth that can be replicated in their communities.
    • How the CEBC can assist their agency with selecting and implementing a new program that supports youth transitioning into adulthood.

    Mark Courtney, PhD, is a professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago and an affiliated scholar at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. Dr. Courtney is a national expert on child welfare issues and policies. His fields of special interests are child welfare policy and services, the connection between child welfare services and other institutions serving marginalized populations, and the professionalization of social work. His current work includes studies of the adult functioning former foster children, experimental evaluation of independent living services for foster youth, and the influences of juvenile courts on the operation of the child welfare system.

    Jared Martin, MA, is a Research Associate with the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego. Jared supports the CEBC’s work on promoting guidance and resources on the implementation of evidence-based practices, which includes conducting trainings on implementation issues, providing technical assistance, and synthesizing the latest implementation research for the CEBC website.


Reducing the Use of Psychotropic Medications through Increased Use of Evidence-Based Practices for Children and Youth in Foster Care - March 2016


    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, March 24th, from 10:00 to 11:10 am (PDT). It is 1 hour and 8 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Jared Martin, MA, discussed how there is increasing concern nationwide about the use of psychotropic medications among children and youth in foster care and the recognition that these medications may not be the most appropriate treatment option. As states and counties move toward decreasing the use of psychotropic medications among children and youth in foster care, it is important that child welfare and mental health agencies enhance and strengthen their available psychosocial interventions to ensure that the behavioral and mental health needs of children and youth in foster care are being met. The goal of this webinar was to provide leaders and decision-makers in child welfare and mental health agencies with vital information on how to prepare for the transition from psychotropic medication use to empirically supported psychosocial practices that safely and effectively help children and youth in foster care.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • The rational for the use of evidence-based psychosocial interventions prior to or in place of psychotropic medications in most cases
    • How to properly identify and select an evidence-based practice that addresses the behavioral and mental health needs of children and youth in your community
    • How to effectively prepare for the implementation of evidence-based practices in your community, including addressing potential barriers and challenges

    Jared Martin, MA, is a Research Associate with the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego. Jared supports the CEBC’s work on promoting guidance and resources on the implementation of evidence-based practices, which includes conducting trainings on implementation issues, providing technical assistance, and synthesizing the latest implementation research for the CEBC website.


2015

Screening and Assessment in Child Welfare: Using the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse’s Measurement Tools Section - October 2015

    The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, October 28th, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PDT). It is 50 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Brent Crandal, PhD, and Jared Martin, MA, discussed how evidence-based screening and assessment tools are increasingly used in child welfare. They highlighted how utilizing such tools can aid child welfare workers with effectively identifying the needs of children and youth and efficiently offering them more beneficial services. Dr. Crandal and Mr. Martin discussed the critical role of evidence-based screening and assessment in child welfare and introduced participants to the new features of the CEBC Measurement Tools section.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Understand the difference between screening and assessment in child welfare
    • Understand the background and rationale for utilizing evidence-based screening and assessment tools in child welfare systems
    • Understand how to effectively use and understand the measurement tools section on the CEBC website

    Brent Crandal, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and research investigator at the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego.

    Jared Martin, MA, is a Research Associate with the Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego.


Using the CEBC Selection and Implementation Guide: How to Apply the Guide to Common Situations in Child Welfare - Part 2 - May 2015

    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, May 14th, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PDT). It is 55 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar. Click here for handouts for the webinar.

    In this second presentation of a two part series, Jennifer Rolls-Reutz and Rhonda Williams discussed the use of the Selection and Implementation Guide during the Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainability Phases. They examined an in-depth case example in order to illustrate how the Guide can be used in the implementation of a new practice. To view Part 1, click here.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Understand the need for and importance of an Implementation Team throughout the implementation process.
    • Be able to tailor CEBC tools and resources to fit the needs of the local system and selected program.
    • Be able to identify ways to overcome common barriers to implementation, including sustainability of programs

    Jennifer Rolls Reutz is the Research Program Specialist for the CEBC. She has a Master's degree in Public Health from San Diego State University.

    Rhonda Williams is the Research Associate for the CEBC. Rhonda has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and two Master's of Arts degrees, one in Human Behavior and the other in Counseling.


Using the CEBC Selection and Implementation Guide: How to Apply the Guide to Common Situations in Child Welfare - Part 1 - March 2015

    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, March 5th, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PST). It is 55 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar. Click here for handouts for the webinar.

    In this first presentation of a two-part series, Cambria Rose Walsh, Jennifer Rolls-Reutz, and Rhonda Williams discussed the use of the Selection and Implementation Guide during the Exploration Phase. They examined an in-depth case example in order to illustrate how the Guide can be used in the selection of a new practice. The second webinar will be held in late Spring 2015 and will focus on Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainability.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Understand the need for and importance of an Implementation Team
    • Locate data sources for use in examining the identified problem
    • Compare multiple programs and determine their fit for addressing the identified problem

    Cambria Rose Walsh is currently the Project Manager of the CEBC, overseeing the day-to-day operations of the project. She has a Master’s in Social Work from San Diego State University and has been licensed as a clinical social worker since 2005.

    Jennifer Rolls Reutz is the Research Program Specialist for the CEBC. She has a Master's degree in Public Health from San Diego State University.

    Rhonda Williams is the Research Associate for the CEBC. Rhonda has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and two Master's of Arts degrees, one in Human Behavior and the other in Counseling.


2014

Teaching Students How to Use the CEBC - November 2014

    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, November 6th, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PST). It is 43 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Dr. Emily Trask discusses how to teach students to utilize the CEBC website with the goal of identifying evidence-based practices. She provided an overview of the CEBC content and demonstrated how to navigate through the website. In addition, she presented information regarding the scientific rating scale used by the CEBC and how to interpret it. Dr. Trask also discussed how to use the scientific rating scale as well as the Child Welfare System Relevance Level when reviewing a program to determine the effectiveness of a specific treatment for a specific presenting problem.

    By the end of the webinar participants will be able to:

    • Identify students for whom training on the CEBC would be useful
    • Provide example of a course assignment using the CEBC, including demonstration and practice
    • Provide suggestions about how to evaluate students' knowledge of the CEBC

    Dr. Trask is a Senior Mental Health Researcher in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego and a consultant for the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare. She has a doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her research focuses on improving mental health outcomes for children and youth through implementation of evidence-based treatments. She has examined outcomes for youth receiving public mental health services and who have experienced childhood sexual abuse. She is currently studying the use of common elements of evidence-based treatment in community mental health settings.


Looking Beyond the Numbers - June 2014

    The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, June 3rd, from 9:30 to 10:30 am (PDT). It is 58 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Cambria Rose Walsh, LCSW, Project Manager for the CEBC, and Rhonda Williams, MA, Research Associate for the CEBC, review the changes that have been made to the Scientific Rating Scale and Child Welfare System Relevance Levels on the CEBC over the past 8 years. Cambria and Rhonda discuss that, while the rating scale and levels are meant to assist users, it is important to look beyond these when making critical decisions about selecting and implementing programs. Cambria and Rhonda present information regarding how to best utilize the CEBC. In addition, they discuss the approach of other clearinghouses as compared to the CEBC and why ratings of the same programs may differ.

    By the end of the webinar participants will be able to answer such questions as:

    • Looking beyond the ratings: What do these numbers really mean? What else should I look for regarding research evidence besides the CEBC Scientific Rating?
    • Looking beyond the levels: What do these Child Welfare System Relevance Levels really tell me?
    • The CEBC versus other clearinghouses: How can the same program have different “ratings” on the different clearinghouses? How do I look at all this information?

    Cambria has experience in working with counties and agencies on the implementation of SafeCare® and Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). In addition, she has an extensive history working with families involved with the child welfare system. She has a background in mental health and has worked as a therapist for children who were impacted by abuse and their families. She developed a training program that focused on educating child welfare workers about domestic violence and its impact on families and provided direct support to the workers during home visits.

    Rhonda has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and two Master's of Arts degrees, one in Human Behavior and the other in Counseling. Rhonda assists the CEBC Research Coordinator by providing research support such as performing literature reviews and summarizing relevant published, peer-reviewed research articles. She also is one of the CEBC program raters and speaks about the CEBC research process in presentations.


Treatment for Trauma-Exposed Adults – April 2014

    The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, April 9th, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PDT). It is 57 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Dr. Joanne L. Davis, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology, Director of Undergraduate Studies in Psychology, and Executive Director of the Institute of Trauma, Adversity, and Injustice at the University of Tulsa, reviews numerous adult-focused therapeutic approaches that are currently available for treating the common consequences of experiencing traumatic events. Joanne presented information regarding the review process of the evidence for the treatment approaches, as well as the quality and quantity of evidence supporting their use. . In addition, she provided an overview of the content, approach, and evidence for these therapies and how the therapies differ in terms of their philosophy, target symptoms, and content.

    By the end of the webinar participants will be able to:

    • Identify three adult trauma treatments with strong empirical evidence of efficacy.
    • Identify the areas considered in determining the evidence base for adult trauma treatments.
    • Describe the general treatment components for two treatments with strong empirical evidence of efficacy.

    Joanne L. Davis is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Traumatic Stress. She received her doctorate from the University of Arkansas, and completed an internship at the Medical University of South Carolina and a 2-year fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center in Charleston, South Carolina. Her research interests include the assessment, treatment, and prevention of interpersonal violence and its effects. In recent years, she has focused on the assessment and treatment of chronic nightmares and other sleep disturbances. She has published over 60 journal articles and book chapters in the area of traumatic stress and has written a book on treating chronic nightmares.


2013

Assessing Evidence-Based Practices in Child Welfare: A Benefit-Cost Approach – November 2013

    The webinar was originally recorded on Friday, November 15th, from 10:00 to 11:30 am (PDT). It is 84 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    This webinar, led by Stephanie Lee, focused on how the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) uses benefit-cost analysis to inform policymakers in that state. The policy context that allows to WSIPP to conduct its research, as well as the advantages and limitations of economic analysis, was discussed as well.

    By the end of the webinar, in addition to hearing about Washington's unique story, participants will receive:

    • Information on how benefit-cost analysis can provide objective insights into policy choices
    • An overview of the methods WSIPP uses to compute benefits and costs of programs and policy options
    • Examples of benefit-cost results for evidence-based options in child welfare

    Stephanie Lee is a Senior Research Associate at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP), a non-partisan organization created by the legislature to carry out practical research on issues of importance to Washington. Since 2007, Stephanie has been focused on identifying and evaluating the research evidence for programs and policies that affect children, particularly in the areas of child welfare and mental health. Her current work is centered on estimating the long-term economic impacts of strategies to improve outcomes for people in the state of Washington. Stephanie leads WSIPP's work with the Results First initiative, a collaboration between the MacArthur Foundation and the Pew Center on the States. This project aims to develop and extend the capability of WSIPP's benefit-cost software, and to support other states in using the WSIPP benefit-cost approach in their own specific contexts.


"So Much Trauma, So Many Interventions: How Do We Choose?" Part 2 - June 2013

    The webinar was originally recorded on Friday, June 28th, from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm (PDT). It is 53 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    This presentation is a follow-up to the one presented in May 2013 by Dr. Ben Saunders, "So Much Trauma, So Many Interventions: How Do We Choose?" (listed above as Part 1).

    This webinar focused on what to consider when making decisions about which evidence-based intervention is most appropriate for a client who has experienced trauma.

    Lucy Berliner, MSW, is the director of the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress in Seattle, Washington. She is also a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Her activities include clinical practice with child and adult victims of trauma and crime; research on the impact of trauma and the effectiveness of clinical and societal interventions; and participation in local and national social policy initiatives to promote the interests of trauma and crime victims. Lucy has served as a member of the CEBC’s Scientific Panel since it was formed in 2005.


"So Much Trauma, So Many Interventions: How Do We Choose?" Part 1 - May 2013

    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, May 16th, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PDT). It is 60 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Dr. Benjamin Saunders, Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, first reviews many of the trauma interventions ranked highly for their effectiveness in the CEBC as well as several important promising practices. Characteristics such as the target populations, target problems, length of treatment, intervention components and quality of supporting research will be discussed.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will:

    • Know the fundamental characteristics of the most important evidence-based trauma treatments now available.

    Dr. Saunders also serves as the Associate Director of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center and as Director of the NCVC’s Family and Child Program. Dr. Saunders received his PhD in clinical social work from Florida State University in 1982; a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy from Virginia Tech in 1979; and a B.A., in religious studies from the University of South Florida in 1977. He is a Licensed Independent Social Worker-Clinical Practice, a member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers, and a Diplomate in Clinical Social Work. He is also a founding member of the CEBC Scientific Panel where he continues to contribute his expertise to research-related questions the CEBC staff may encounter.


Integrating Evidence-Based Practice into Strategic Planning: Building an Evidence-Based Continuum of Services - March 2013

    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, March 21st, from 10:00 to 11:00 am (PDT). It is 58 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Cambria Rose Walsh, LCSW, CEBC Project Manager, and Jennifer Rolls-Reutz, MPH, CEBC Research Coordinator, focus on the initial stage of implementation - the Exploration phase- which builds the foundation for successful implementation. During the webinar, the four phases of Implementation will be defined. In addition, practical ways that the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare (CEBC) can be used to help in the Exploration phase will be discussed. Information will be presented on how CEBC staff members have been working with child welfare systems to evaluate the level of evidence for programs in their systems and to create strategic plans for how to increase evidence-based practices (EBP) in their community. Specific information will be presented on the process that the CEBC has developed and how it can be applied to child welfare systems and within different communities.

    By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

    • Understand the practical applications of the CEBC website.
    • Define the phases of Implementation.
    • Apply lessons learned from the CEBC work in the area of Exploration to your own communities.

2012 and earlier

Parenting Programs for Children Birth-8: What is the Evidence and What Seem to be the Common Components? - December 2012

    The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, December 13th, from 9:30 to 11:00 am (PST). It is 85 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Dr. Rick Barth, Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland, and Kyla Liggett-Creel, a Clinical Instructor at the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland, review evidence-based parent training programs and provide evidence that manualized parenting interventions tend to have common elements. In the United States, more than 800,000 child welfare involved families may receive parent education each year. Parent education programs are commonly implemented but not commonly evaluated. Relatively few are evidence-based. This is especially true for parenting programs targeting families with young children. This presentation will describe some of those elements as well as common tools used to teach families. Considerations that may help child welfare agencies make decisions about whether to endeavor to institute manualized parent education programs or to try to use the common elements as a framework for intervention will be discussed. This workshop addresses these shortcomings.

    The learning objectives of the webinar are that the participants will be able to:

    • Identify and describe current evidence based parent education models being used in child welfare.
    • Identify common elements used in parent training for families with children under the age of 8 (with recognition of some differences for parents of children 0-2 and 4-8).
    • Describe the evidence behind the identified parent education models.
    • Describe the difference between manualized parent education programs and common elements-based approaches and consider next steps in developing effective parent education programs in their agencies.

    Dr. Barth has also served as a chaired professor at UC Berkeley and University of North Carolina. He has authored many books, chapters, and articles on children’s services practice, programs, policy and research. Most recently his writing has focused on parent training and its intersection with child welfare and understanding the common elements of practice. He has served as a lecturer and consultant to numerous countries, states, and universities. He has testified before Congressional and state government sub-committees about processes and outcomes of child welfare services. Dr. Barth is also a member of the CEBC Scientific Panel. Ms. Liggett-Creel has served as a Senior Clinical Social Worker at the Center for Infant Studies for three years. She was previously a Supervising Clinical Social worker at Kennedy Krieger Institute for nine years (1999-2008) and coordinated a clinic for children between the ages of birth to five who had experienced trauma. Currently, Ms. Liggett-Creel is working with the Keep project offering behavior management education to foster parents in the State of Maryland. Her doctoral work focuses on early childhood development, trauma and child welfare.


Approaches and Outcomes for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Child Welfare - May 2012

    The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, May 30th, 10:00 to 11:30 am (PDT). It is 92 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Dr. Greg Aarons, psychologist and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, will describe implementation approaches relevant to child welfare and mental health systems and organizations. He will describe the four phases of implementation including Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (the EPIS model) and will illustrate factors likely to be important in each of the phases. Dr. Aarons will also share findings that demonstrate that the implementation and use of evidence-based practices are beneficial to both the child welfare worker and his/her clients. Specifically, he addresses:

    • The four phases of implementation in the EPIS model
    • The outer and inner implementation contexts in each phase
    • Implementation outcomes for case-managers and clients

    Dr. Aarons’ current work, funded by National Institute of Mental Health and the Centers for Disease Control, focuses on developing and testing approaches to evidence-based practice implementation and sustainment in health, mental health, and social service settings. Dr. Aarons’ current implementation studies examine evidence-based practice implementation for child neglect and the use of community engagement and collaboration to support appropriate adaptation of system, organization, and intervention characteristics during implementation. Dr. Aarons is also an implementation consultant for the CEBC.


Evidence-Based Treatments (EBTs) for Ethnic Minority Youth: What We Know and What We Don’t Know - February 2012

    The webinar was originally recorded on Tuesday, February 14th, from 10:00 to 11:30 am (PST). It is 90 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    In this presentation, Dr. Stan Huey, Jr., Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Southern California, reviews what the research field knows, and what it does not know, about evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for ethnic minority youth. Specifically, he addresses:

    • Whether EBTs are efficacious for ethnic minority youth
    • Whether minority and non-minority youth benefit equally from psychotherapy
    • The effectiveness of cultural adaptations when treating minority youth
    • The limitations of the current literature, clinical implications, and future directions

    Dr. Huey is also the principal investigator for a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded clinical trial for juvenile gang offenders. Dr. Huey’s research centers on evidence-based treatments for ethnic minorities, and how ethnicity and culture influence psychotherapy outcomes. His recent work has focused on effective treatments for youth with serious behavioral and emotional problems, culturally responsive treatments for ethnic minorities, and treatment mechanisms that account for clinical change. Dr. Huey is also a member of the CEBC Scientific Panel.


Knowing the Best of What’s Out There: Understanding and Identifying Evidence-Based Practices in Child Welfare - November 2011

    The webinar is 65 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here* to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

    This CEBC-produced webinar explores the various challenges related to evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the field of child welfare, as well as providing information about its resources offered to assist the website’s visitors. In particular, it provides an overview of:

    • The history, purpose, and goals of the CEBC
    • The importance of EBPs within child welfare
    • The CEBC’s Scientific Rating Scale and process for rating programs
    • Information on implementation.

    There is also a discussion on practical applications for the website.

    [*Please note that due to technical difficulties, minutes 47 through 53 of the webinar were recorded in audio format only. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please feel free to go to the Implementation Resources section of the CEBC website to follow along with the audio. Thank you for your patience and understanding.]


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*The content of the presentations listed on this page reflects the thinking of the presenters. They do not necessarily represent official policy or positions of the sponsor.