Webinars

Below is a list of the webinars the CEBC has sponsored.* Please click on the title to get a description of the webinar and the link to the recording of webinar itself. You will need to have speakers or headphones plugged into your computer to be able to hear the audio portion of the presentation.

Approaches and Outcomes for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Child Welfare - May 2012


The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 10:00 - 11:30am (PDT). The webinar is approximately 92 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Dr. Greg Aarons, psychologist and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, will describe implementation approaches relevant to child welfare and mental health systems and organizations. He will describe the four phases of implementation including Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (the EPIS model) and will illustrate factors likely to be important in each of the phases. Dr. Aarons will also share findings that demonstrate that the implementation and use of evidence-based practices are beneficial to both the child welfare worker and his/her clients. Specifically, he addresses:

  • The four phases of implementation in the EPIS model
  • The outer and inner implementation contexts in each phase
  • Implementation outcomes for case-managers and clients

Dr. Aarons’ current work, funded by National Institute of Mental Health and the Centers for Disease Control, focuses on developing and testing approaches to evidence-based practice implementation and sustainment in health, mental health, and social service settings. Dr. Aarons’ current implementation studies examine evidence-based practice implementation for child neglect and the use of community engagement and collaboration to support appropriate adaptation of system, organization, and intervention characteristics during implementation. Dr. Aarons is also an implementation consultant for the CEBC.


Assessing Evidence-Based Practices in Child Welfare: A Benefit-Cost Approach – November 2013


The webinar was originally recorded on Friday, November 15, 2013, from 10:00 am to 11:30 pm (PDT). The webinar is 84 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

This webinar, led by Stephanie Lee, focused on how the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) uses benefit-cost analysis to inform policymakers in that state. The policy context that allows to WSIPP to conduct its research, as well as the advantages and limitations of economic analysis, was discussed as well.

By the end of the webinar, in addition to hearing about Washington's unique story, participants will receive:

  • Information on how benefit-cost analysis can provide objective insights into policy choices
  • An overview of the methods WSIPP uses to compute benefits and costs of programs and policy options
  • Examples of benefit-cost results for evidence-based options in child welfare

Stephanie Lee is a Senior Research Associate at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP), a non-partisan organization created by the legislature to carry out practical research on issues of importance to Washington. Since 2007, Stephanie has been focused on identifying and evaluating the research evidence for programs and policies that affect children, particularly in the areas of child welfare and mental health. Her current work is centered on estimating the long-term economic impacts of strategies to improve outcomes for people in the state of Washington. Stephanie leads WSIPP's work with the Results First initiative, a collaboration between the MacArthur Foundation and the Pew Center on the States. This project aims to develop and extend the capability of WSIPP's benefit-cost software, and to support other states in using the WSIPP benefit-cost approach in their own specific contexts.


Evidence-Based Treatments (EBTs) for Ethnic Minority Youth: What We Know and What We Don’t Know - February 2012


The webinar was originally recorded on Tuesday, February 14, 2012, from 10:00 — 11:30am (PST). The webinar is 90 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Dr. Stan Huey, Jr., Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Southern California, reviews what the research field knows, and what it doesn’t know, about evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for ethnic minority youth. Specifically, he addresses:

  • Whether EBTs are efficacious for ethnic minority youth
  • Whether minority and non-minority youth benefit equally from psychotherapy
  • The effectiveness of cultural adaptations when treating minority youth
  • The limitations of the current literature, clinical implications, and future directions

Dr. Huey is also the principal investigator for a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded clinical trial for juvenile gang offenders. Dr. Huey’s research centers on evidence-based treatments for ethnic minorities, and how ethnicity and culture influence psychotherapy outcomes. His recent work has focused on effective treatments for youth with serious behavioral and emotional problems, culturally responsive treatments for ethnic minorities, and treatment mechanisms that account for clinical change. Dr. Huey is also a member of the CEBC Scientific Panel.


Integrating Evidence-Based Practice into Strategic Planning: Building an Evidence-Based Continuum of Services - March 2013


The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, March 21, 2013, from 10:00 — 11:00am (PDT). The webinar is 58 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Cambria Rose Walsh, LCSW, CEBC Project Manager, and Jennifer Rolls-Reutz, MPH, CEBC Research Coordinator, focus on the initial stage of implementation - the Exploration phase- which builds the foundation for successful implementation. During the webinar, the four phases of Implementation will be defined. In addition, practical ways that the California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare (CEBC) can be used to help in the Exploration phase will be discussed. Information will be presented on how CEBC staff members have been working with child welfare systems to evaluate the level of evidence for programs in their systems and to create strategic plans for how to increase evidence-based practices (EBP) in their community. Specific information will be presented on the process that the CEBC has developed and how it can be applied to child welfare systems and within different communities.

By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the practical applications of the CEBC website.
  • Define the phases of Implementation.
  • Apply lessons learned from the CEBC work in the area of Exploration to your own communities.

Knowing the Best of What’s Out There: Understanding and Identifying Evidence-Based Practices in Child Welfare - November 2011


The webinar is 65 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here* to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

This CEBC-produced webinar explores the various challenges related to evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the field of child welfare, as well as providing information about its resources offered to assist the website’s visitors. In particular, it provides an overview of:

  • The history, purpose, and goals of the CEBC
  • The importance of EBPs within child welfare
  • The CEBC’s Scientific Rating Scale and process for rating programs
  • Information on implementation.

There is also a discussion on practical applications for the website.

[*Please note that due to technical difficulties, minutes 47 through 53 of the webinar were recorded in audio format only. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please feel free to go to the Implementation Resources section of the CEBC website to follow along with the audio. Thank you for your patience and understanding.]


Looking Beyond the Numbers - June 2014


The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, June 3, 2014 from 9:30 am to 10:30 am (PST). The webinar is 58:16 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Cambria Rose Walsh, LCSW, Project Manager for the CEBC, and Rhonda Williams, MA, Research Associate for the CEBC, review the changes that have been made to the Scientific Rating Scale and Child Welfare System Relevance Levels on the CEBC over the past 8 years. Cambria and Rhonda discuss that, while the rating scale and levels are meant to assist users, it is important to look beyond these when making critical decisions about selecting and implementing programs. Cambria and Rhonda present information regarding how to best utilize the CEBC. In addition, they discuss the approach of other clearinghouses as compared to the CEBC and why ratings of the same programs may differ.

By the end of the webinar participants will be able to answer such questions as:

  • Looking beyond the ratings: What do these numbers really mean? What else should I look for regarding research evidence besides the CEBC Scientific Rating?
  • Looking beyond the levels: What do these Child Welfare System Relevance Levels really tell me?
  • The CEBC versus other clearinghouses: How can the same program have different “ratings” on the different clearinghouses? How do I look at all this information?

Cambria has experience in working with counties and agencies on the implementation of SafeCare® and Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). In addition, she has an extensive history working with families involved with the child welfare system. She has a background in mental health and has worked as a therapist for children who were impacted by abuse and their families. She developed a training program that focused on educating child welfare workers about domestic violence and its impact on families and provided direct support to the workers during home visits.

Rhonda has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and two Master's of Arts degrees, one in Human Behavior and the other in Counseling. Rhonda assists the CEBC Research Coordinator by providing research support such as performing literature reviews and summarizing relevant published, peer-reviewed research articles. She also is one of the CEBC program raters and speaks about the CEBC research process in presentations.


Parenting Programs for Children Birth-8: What is the Evidence and What Seem to be the Common Components? - December 2012


The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, December 13, 2012, from 9:30 — 11:00 am (PST). The webinar is 85-minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Dr. Rick Barth, Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland, and Kyla Liggett-Creel, a Clinical Instructor at the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland, review evidence-based parent training programs and provide evidence that manualized parenting interventions tend to have common elements. In the United States, more than 800,000 child welfare involved families may receive parent education each year. Parent education programs are commonly implemented but not commonly evaluated. Relatively few are evidence-based. This is especially true for parenting programs targeting families with young children. This presentation will describe some of those elements as well as common tools used to teach families. Considerations that may help child welfare agencies make decisions about whether to endeavor to institute manualized parent education programs or to try to use the common elements as a framework for intervention will be discussed. This workshop addresses these shortcomings.

The learning objectives of the webinar are that the participants will be able to:

  • Identify and describe current evidence based parent education models being used in child welfare.
  • Identify common elements used in parent training for families with children under the age of 8 (with recognition of some differences for parents of children 0-2 and 4-8).
  • Describe the evidence behind the identified parent education models.
  • Describe the difference between manualized parent education programs and common elements-based approaches and consider next steps in developing effective parent education programs in their agencies.

Dr. Barth has also served as a chaired professor at UC Berkeley and University of North Carolina. He has authored many books, chapters, and articles on children’s services practice, programs, policy and research. Most recently his writing has focused on parent training and its intersection with child welfare and understanding the common elements of practice. He has served as a lecturer and consultant to numerous countries, states, and universities. He has testified before Congressional and state government sub-committees about processes and outcomes of child welfare services. Dr. Barth is also a member of the CEBC Scientific Panel. Ms. Liggett-Creel has served as a Senior Clinical Social Worker at the Center for Infant Studies for three years. She was previously a Supervising Clinical Social worker at Kennedy Krieger Institute for nine years (1999-2008) and coordinated a clinic for children between the ages of birth to five who had experienced trauma. Currently, Ms. Liggett-Creel is working with the Keep project offering behavior management education to foster parents in the State of Maryland. Her doctoral work focuses on early childhood development, trauma and child welfare.


"So Much Trauma, So Many Interventions: How Do We Choose?" Part 1 - May 2013


The webinar was originally recorded on Thursday, May 16, 2013, from 10:00 - 11:00 am (PDT). The webinar is 60-minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Dr. Benjamin Saunders, Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, first reviews many of the trauma interventions ranked highly for their effectiveness in the CEBC as well as several important promising practices. Characteristics such as the target populations, target problems, length of treatment, intervention components and quality of supporting research will be discussed.

By the conclusion of this webinar, participants will:

  • Know the fundamental characteristics of the most important evidence-based trauma treatments now available.

Dr. Saunders also serves as the Associate Director of the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center and as Director of the NCVC’s Family and Child Program. Dr. Saunders received his Ph.D. in clinical social work from Florida State University in 1982; a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy from Virginia Tech in 1979; and a B.A., in religious studies from the University of South Florida in 1977. He is a Licensed Independent Social Worker-Clinical Practice, a member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers, and a Diplomate in Clinical Social Work. He is also a founding member of the CEBC Scientific Panel where he continues to contribute his expertise to research-related questions the CEBC staff may encounter.


"So Much Trauma, So Many Interventions: How Do We Choose?" Part 2 - June 2013


The webinar was originally recorded on Friday, June 28, 2013, from 11:00 am to 12:00 pm (PDT). The webinar is 53 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

This presentation is a follow-up to the one presented in May 2013 by Dr. Ben Saunders, "So Much Trauma, So Many Interventions: How Do We Choose?" (listed above as Part 1).

This webinar focused on what to consider when making decisions about which evidence-based intervention is most appropriate for a client who has experienced trauma.

Lucy Berliner, MSW, is the director of the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress in Seattle, Washington. She is also a clinical associate professor at the University of Washington School of Social Work and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Her activities include clinical practice with child and adult victims of trauma and crime; research on the impact of trauma and the effectiveness of clinical and societal interventions; and participation in local and national social policy initiatives to promote the interests of trauma and crime victims. Lucy has served as a member of the CEBC’s Scientific Panel since it was formed in 2005.

Treatment for Trauma-Exposed Adults – April 2014


The webinar was originally recorded on Wednesday, April 9th from 10:00 am to 11:00 am (PST). The webinar is 57 minutes long. Please click here to download a pdf version of the PowerPoint slides from this webinar. Please click here to start viewing and listening to the webinar.

In this presentation, Dr. Joanne L. Davis, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology, Director of Undergraduate Studies in Psychology, and Executive Director of the Institute of Trauma, Adversity, and Injustice at the University of Tulsa, reviews numerous adult-focused therapeutic approaches that are currently available for treating the common consequences of experiencing traumatic events. Joanne presented information regarding the review process of the evidence for the treatment approaches, as well as the quality and quantity of evidence supporting their use. . In addition, she provided an overview of the content, approach, and evidence for these therapies and how the therapies differ in terms of their philosophy, target symptoms, and content.

By the end of the webinar participants will be able to:

  • Identify three adult trauma treatments with strong empirical evidence of efficacy.
  • Identify the areas considered in determining the evidence base for adult trauma treatments.
  • Describe the general treatment components for two treatments with strong empirical evidence of efficacy.

Joanne L. Davis is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Traumatic Stress. She received her doctorate from the University of Arkansas, and completed an internship at the Medical University of South Carolina and a 2-year fellowship at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center in Charleston, South Carolina. Her research interests include the assessment, treatment, and prevention of interpersonal violence and its effects. In recent years, she has focused on the assessment and treatment of chronic nightmares and other sleep disturbances. She has published over 60 journal articles and book chapters in the area of traumatic stress and has written a book on treating chronic nightmares.


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*The content of the presentations listed on this page reflect the thinking of the presenters. They do not necessarily represent official policy or positions of the sponsor.