Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT)

Scientific Rating:
2
Supported by Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Substance Abuse Treatment (Adolescent).

Target Population: Adolescents with drug use and other problem behaviors. Taken from description found at http://archives.drugabuse.gov/TXManuals/BSFT/BSFT2.html on May 2, 2014.

For children/adolescents ages: 12 – 18

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 12 – 18

Brief Description

BSFT is a brief intervention used to treat adolescent drug use that occurs with other problem behaviors. These co-occurring problem behaviors include conduct problems at home and at school, oppositional behavior, delinquency, associating with antisocial peers, aggressive and violent behavior, and risky sexual behavior. BSFT is based on three basic principles: First, BSFT is a family systems approach. Second, patterns of interaction in the family influence the behavior of each family member. The role of the BSFT counselor is to identify the patterns of family interaction that are associated with the adolescent's behavior problems. Third, plan interventions that carefully target and provide practical ways to change those patterns of interaction that are directly linked to the adolescent's drug use and other problem behaviors. Condensed from description found at http://archives.drugabuse.gov/TXManuals/BSFT/BSFT2.html on May 2, 2014.

Program Goals:

The goals of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) are:

  • For the child/youth:
    • Reduce behavior problems, while improving self-control
    • Reduce associations with antisocial peers
    • Reduce drug use
    • Develop prosocial behaviors
  • For the family:
    • Improvements in maladaptive patterns of family interactions (family functioning)
    • Improvements in family communication, conflict-resolution, and problem-solving skills
    • Improvements in family cohesiveness, collaboration, and child/family bonding
    • Effective parenting, including successful management of children's behavior and positive affect in the parent-child interactions

Child/Adolescent Services

Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: Because family problems are an integral part of the profile of drug abusing adolescents and have been linked to the initiation and maintenance of adolescent drug use, it is necessary to improve conditions in the youth's most lasting and influential environment: the family. Taken from description found at http://archives.drugabuse.gov/TXManuals/BSFT/BSFT2.html on May 2, 2014.

Parent/Caregiver Services

Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Being a parent/caregiver of adolescents who use drugs and have associated problem behaviors, lack of parental leadership, unhealthy parental collaboration, lack of guidance and nurturance to adolescents in their care

Delivery Settings

Not Specified

Languages

Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) has materials available in a language other than English:

Spanish

For information on which materials are available in this language, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program, and there is training available for this program.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program is rated a "2 - Supported by Research Evidence" on the Scientific Rating Scale based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The program must have at least one rigorous randomized controlled trial with a sustained effect of at least 6 months. The article(s) below that reports outcomes from an RCT showing a sustained effect of at least 6 months has an asterisk (*) at the beginning of its entry. Please see the Scientific Rating Scale for more information.

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Show relevant research...

Multiple meta-analyses, see citations following, have also been conducted on Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) though these articles are not used for rating and therefore are not summarized:

  • Szapocznik, J. , & Williams, R. (2000). Brief strategic family therapy: Twenty-five years of interplay among theory, research and practice in adolescent behavior problems and drug abuse. Clinical Child & Family Psychology Review, 3(2), 117-134.
  • Robbins, M. , Bachrach, K. , & Szapocznik, J. (2002). Bridging the research-practice gap in adolescent substance abuse treatment: The case of brief strategic family therapy. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 23(2), 123-132.
  • Santisteban, D. , Suarez-Morales, L. , Robbins, M. , & Szapocznik, J. (2006). Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Lessons learned in efficacy research and challenges to blending research and practice. Family Process, 45(2), 259-271.

When more than 10 research articles have been published in peer-reviewed journals, the CEBC reviews all of the articles as part of the rating process and identifies the 10 most relevant articles, with a focus on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled studies that have an impact on the rating. The 10 articles chosen for BSFT are summarized below:

*Szapocznik, J., Kurtines, W. M., Foote, F. H., Perez-Vidal, A., & Hervis. O. (1983). Conjoint versus one-person family therapy: Some evidence for the effectiveness of conducting family therapy through one person. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 51, 889-899.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 37 adolescents and their families

Population:

  • Age — 12-20 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Hispanic (84.4% Cuban American)
  • Gender — 29 males, 8 females
  • Status — Participants were obtained through court and community agency referrals, public service announcements, and self-referrals

Location/Institution: Spanish Family Guidance Center, University of Miami, FL

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study compares the relative effectiveness of two treatments based on Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT): One-person family therapy (OPFT) and conjoint family therapy (CFT). Both developed within the conceptual framework of BSFT, OPFT involves therapy with mainly one family member, whereas CFT involves the whole – or major subsystems of the – family. Participants were randomly assigned to either OPFT or CFT conditions. Measures included the Psychiatric Status Schedule (PSS), which assesses the adolescent’s psychiatric and psychosocial functioning and also includes a Drug Abuse Score, as well as the Behavior Problem Checklist (BPC), which assesses multiple dimensions of problem behavior, including conduct. For both treatment conditions, improvements from pre- to posttreatment were seen for all of the clinical-outcome measures, including the Drug Abuse Score on the PSS. However, OPFT had slightly more of an improvement in drug abuse levels than CFT, though the OPFT condition had slightly more severe pre-assessment drug abuse levels. Behavior problems at follow-up continued to improve for those in the OPFT condition, whereas those in CFT were worse at follow-up than at posttreatment assessment. Overall, both conditions were highly effective in improving family functioning, and OPFT was slightly more effective in reducing identified patient symptomology, including drug abuse. Notable limitations of the study include the lack of a no-treatment control condition, the homogeneity of the sample (all Hispanic), as well as small sample size.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 6-12 months.

*Szapocznik, J., Kurtines, W. M., Foote, F., Perez-Vidal, A., & Hervis, O. (1986). Conjoint versus one-person family therapy: Further evidence for the effectiveness of conducting family therapy through one person with drug-abusing adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 54, 395-397.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 35 adolescents and their families

Population:

  • Age — Mean age 14.7 years (SD = 7.3)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Hispanic-American (77% Cuban American)
  • Gender — Not Specified
  • Status — Participants were obtained through court and community agency referrals, public service announcements, and self-referrals.

Location/Institution: Miami, FL/Spanish Family Guidance Center, University of Miami

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The data that was collected for this study was part of a second phase of the study described above (Szapocznik, Kurtines, Foote, et al., 1983). This study compares the relative effectiveness of two treatments based on Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT): One-person family therapy (OPFT) and conjoint family therapy (CFT). Both developed within the conceptual framework of BSFT, OPFT involves therapy with mainly one family member, whereas CFT involves the whole – or major subsystems of the – family. Participants were randomly assigned to either OPFT or CFT conditions. Measures included the Psychiatric Status Schedule (PSS), which assesses the adolescents’ psychiatric and psychosocial functioning and also includes a Drug Abuse Score, as well as the Behavior Problem Checklist (BPC), which assesses multiple dimensions of problem behavior, including conduct. The results of the study showed OPFT to be as effective as CFT in both individual and family functioning and appeared to be somewhat better than CFT at sustaining improved functioning in the families at follow-up. On the PSS, which includes the Drug Abuse Score, termination scores were better than intake scores in both conditions. Notable limitations of the study include the lack of a no-treatment control condition, the homogeneity of the sample (all Hispanic), as well as small sample size.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 6-12 months.

Szapocznik, J., Perez-Vidal, A., Brickman, A., Foote, F. H., Santisteban, D., Hervis, O. E. & Kurtines, W. M. (1988). Engaging adolescent drug abusers and their families in treatment: A strategic structural systems approach. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56(4), 552.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 108

Population:

  • Age — 12-21 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — All Hispanic (82% of Cuban origin)
  • Gender — 67% males, 33% females
  • Status — Participants included families of adolescents who were suspected of, or were observed, using drugs.

Location/Institution: Dade County, FL

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Using a two-group experimental design, this study randomly assigned subjects to either strategic structural-systems engagement (SSSE) or engagement as usual (EAU). SSSE was developed within the conceptual framework of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) (Szapocznik, Kurtines, et al., 1983, 1986), which is a structural family-systems approach. This study tested the efficacy of the strategic structural systems engagement procedure for engaging hard-to-reach cases and bringing them to therapy completion. To assess the subject’s psychiatric and psychosocial functioning, the Psychiatric Status Schedule (PSS) was one of the measures used. Another measure used was the Client-Oriented Data Acquisition Process (CODAP), which requests information on drug use by type and frequency. Of all the cases that were initially assigned to either EAU or SSSE, 25% in the EAU condition and 77% in the SSSE condition were successfully terminated. A sustained higher level of engagement was found in the SSSE condition vs. the EAU condition. For example, over 57.7% of the families in the EAU condition failed to come to the center for intake, while only 7.1% of families in the SSSE condition were lost. Some limitations of the study were the lack of post-treatment follow-ups, the self-report nature of the CODAP, and the loss of one of the two therapists early in the study due to illness (the study finished with one therapist vs. the initial two).

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Coatsworth, J., Santisteban, D., McBride, C., & Szapocznik, J. (2001). Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus community control: Engagement, retention, and an exploration of the moderating role of adolescent symptom severity. Family Process, 40(3), 313-332.

Type of Study: One-group pretest/posttest follow-up design
Number of Participants: 104 families

Population:

  • Age — 12-14 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 79 Hispanic families, 25 African American families
  • Gender — 75% male, 25% female
  • Status — Families that had an adolescent between the ages of 12-14 about whom the parents or referring school staff reported a presenting complaint that corresponded to one or more of the following criteria were included in the study: 1) externalizing problems (e.g., conduct/behavior problems), 2) internalizing problems (e.g., anxiety, depression), 3) significant academic problems, or 4) initiation of alcohol or drug use.

Location/Institution: Dade County, FL/Center for Family Studies

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study aimed to extend the body of research investigating the effectiveness of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) to engage and retain families and/or youth in treatment. The sample reported in this article was part of a large-scale, two-phase demonstration study testing the efficacy of BSFT with high-risk minority youth (first-phase: see above summary of Santisteban, Coatsworth, Perez-Vidal et al., 1997). 104 families were randomly assigned to BSFT or a community comparison (CC) condition selected to represent the common engagement and treatment practices of the community. The Revised Behavior Problem Checklist (RBPC), an empirically derived measure consisting of 89 problem behaviors, was administered. Results indicated that the families assigned to BSFT had significantly higher rates of engagement (81% vs. 61%) and retention (71% vs. 42%) than those assigned to CC. A risk-ratio analysis revealed that families randomized into BSFT were 2.3 times more likely both to engage and to retain than families/participants randomized to CC condition. BSFT was also more effective than CC in retaining more severe cases, specifically cases with high levels of adolescent conduct disorder, and, despite the higher percentage of difficult-to-treat cases, achieved comparable treatment effects on behavior problems. A primary limitation of the study was that an intent-to-treat design was not able to be fully implemented. While the experimenters were able to complete termination assessments for 77% of the families that participated in either treatment, limited resources restricted the ability to track and assess families that did not engage into treatment. Also, the study lacked post-intervention data, aside from the two data points of the pre-post design.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Santisteban, D., Perez-Vidal, A., Coatsworth, J., Kurtines, W., Schwartz, S., LaPerriere, A., & Szapocznik, J. (2003). Efficacy of Brief Strategic Family Therapy in modifying Hispanic adolescent behavior problems and substance use. Journal of Family Psychology, 17(1), 121-133.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 126 adolescents & their families

Population:

  • Age — 12-18 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Hispanic (various nationalities: Cuban, Nicaraguan, Colombian, Puerto Rican, Peruvian, Mexican, or Other)
  • Gender — 75% male, 25% female
  • Status — Participants were either self-referred or referred by a school counselor and met the primary inclusion criterion, namely parental or school complaints of externalizing behavior problems.

Location/Institution: Miami, FL/University of Miami

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Hispanic families with a behavior-problem adolescent were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) or group treatment control (GC). Measures used include the Revised Behavior Problem Checklist (RBPC), which measures adolescent behavior problems; the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), which measures drug involvement; the Family Environment Scale (FES) and the Structural Family Systems Rating (SFSR), which both measure family functioning. Results showed that, compared to GC cases, BSFT cases showed significantly greater pre- to post-intervention improvement in parent reports of adolescent conduct problems and delinquency, adolescent reports of marijuana use, and observer ratings and self-reports of family functioning. On all three presenting problems targeted in this study (i.e., conduct problems, peer-based delinquency, and self-reported drug use), BSFT was significantly more efficacious than the GC. For example, in the BSFT condition, 41% who had been using at intake were no longer using at termination of treatment, compared to 13% in the GC condition. Limitations of the study include the lack of follow-up assessments, that termination assessments were conducted only with cases that completed treatment, and that a substantial proportion of treatment completers did not have complete observational data (participants’ entire families had to be present at both intake and termination assessments for the participant to have complete observational data).

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Robbins, M. , Szapocznik, J. , Horigian, V. , Feaster, D. , Puccinelli, M., Jacobs, P., … Brigham, G. (2009). Brief Strategic Family Therapy (tm) for adolescent drug abusers: A multi-site effectiveness study. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 30(3), 269-278.

Type of Study: Multi-site randomized trial
Number of Participants: 377

Population:

  • Age — 12-17 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 44% Hispanic/Latin, 30% White, 23% Black, 3% Other
  • Gender — 78.5% Male, 21.5% Female
  • Status — Participants were adolescents and their family members. Adolescents included in the study were those who used any illicit drug (other than alcohol and tobacco) in the 30-day period that preceded baseline assessment, or those referred to community agencies for the treatment of problems associated with drug use.

Location/Institution: Bayamón, Puerto Rico/Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA); Cincinnati, OH/The Crossroads Center; Denver, CO/Arapahoe House; Jacksonville, FL/Gateway Community Center; Miami, FL/The Village; Salisbury, NC/Daymark Recovery Services; Tarzana, CA/Tarzana Treatment Centers; and Tucson, AZ/La Frontera.

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study builds on emerging research and represents the first examination of the effectiveness of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) in real world settings. Adolescent/family participants were randomized to BSFT or treatment as usual (TAU) at eight community treatment agencies. This paper describes the following aspects of the study: specific aims, research design and study organization, assessment of primary and secondary outcomes, study treatments, data analysis plan, and data monitoring and safety reporting. The analyses and subsequent results have yet to be reported.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 1- 9 months (3-4 month intervention; 4-,8-,12-month follow-ups post-randomization).

Feaster, D. J., Robbins, M. S., Henderson, C., Horigian, V., Puccinelli, M. J., Burlew, A. K., & Szapocznik, J. (2010). Equivalence of family functioning and externalizing behaviors in adolescent substance users of different race/ethnicity. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 38(S1), S113-S124.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — 12-17 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 44% Hispanic/Latin, 30% White, 23% Black, 3% Other
  • Gender — 78.5% Male, 21.5% Female
  • Status — Participants were adolescents with problem substance use in the 30 days prior to screening and their family members.

Location/Institution: Eight outpatient community treatment programs across the United States

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Note: this study uses the same sample as Robbins, Szapocznik, Horigian et al, 2009 above. The study evaluated the effectiveness of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) in reducing externalizing behaviors and drug use in adolescents and measured family functioning across racial/ethnic groups. Adolescents completed the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Predictive Scales (DISC-PS), Youth Self-Report (YSR) of the Child Behavior Checklist, and Self-Report Delinquency Scale. Parents completed the Family Environmental Scale (FES) and Parenting Practices Questionnaire. Results indicated that Black families reported significantly lower externalizing and significantly higher family functioning than did Caucasian families regardless of reporter. Black adolescents also reported lower externalizing than Hispanic and Caucasian adolescents, and Black parents reported higher family functioning than Hispanic and Caucasian parents. The major study limitation was the possibility that Black youth with more severe symptoms may be systematically less likely to be given the opportunity to participate in research trials which may affect generalizability and statistical significance.

Length of postintervention follow-up: Not Specified

Robbins, M. S., Feaster, D. J., Horigian, V. E., Rohrbaugh, M., Shoham, V., Bachrach, K., & ... Szapocznik, J. (2011). Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus treatment as usual: Results of a multisite randomized trial for substance using adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(6), 713-727.   

Type of Study: Multi-site randomized trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — 13-17 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 213 Hispanic, 148 White, 110 Non-Hispanic Black, 5 American Indians/Alaskans, 2 Japanese/Whites, 1 Persian, and 1 Lebanese
  • Gender — 377 Male and 103 Female
  • Status — Participants were adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers.

Location/Institution: La Frontera (Tucson, AZ), The Crossroads Center (Cincinnati, OH), The Village (Miami, FL), Gateway Community Center (Jacksonville, FL), Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA: Bayamón, Puerto Rico), Daymark Recovery Services (Salisbury, NC), Tarzana Treatment Centers (Tarzana, CA), and Arapahoe House (Denver, CO)

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Note: This study uses the same sample as Robbins, Szapocznik, Horigian, et al., 2009 above. This study determines the effectiveness of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Measures used were the Timeline Follow-Back, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, the Parenting Practices Questionnaire, and Family Environmental Scale. The primary outcome was adolescent drug use, assessed monthly via adolescent self-report and urinalysis for up to 1 year post randomization. Secondary outcomes included treatment engagement (≥2 sessions), retention (≥8 sessions), and participants’ reports of family functioning 4, 8, and 12 months following randomization. No overall differences between conditions were observed in the trajectories of self-reports of adolescent drug use. However, the median number of days of self-reported drug use was significantly higher in TAU then BSFT at the final observation point. BSFT was significantly more effective than TAU in engaging, and retaining family members in treatment and in improving parent reports of family functioning. Limitations include low rates in self-reported drug use at baseline and over the course of the study.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 1- 9 months (3-4 month intervention; 4-,8-,12-month follow-ups post-randomization).

Robbins, M. S., Feaster, D. J., Horigian, V. E., Puccinelli, M. J., Henderson, C., & Szapocznik, J. (2011). Therapist adherence in brief strategic family therapy for adolescent drug abusers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(1), 43-53.

Type of Study: Multi-site randomized trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — 12-17 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 213 Hispanic, 148 White, 110 Non-Hispanic Black, 5 American Indians/Alaskans, 2 Japanese/Whites, 1 Persian, and 1 Lebanese
  • Gender — 377 Male and 103 Female
  • Status — Adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers

Location/Institution: La Frontera (Tucson, AZ), The Crossroads Center (Cincinnati, OH), The Village (Miami, FL), Gateway Community Center (Jacksonville, FL), Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA: Bayamón, Puerto Rico), Daymark Recovery Services (Salisbury, NC), Tarzana Treatment Centers (Tarzana, CA), and Arapahoe House (Denver, CO)

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examined the reliability and validity of an observational adherence measure and the relationship between adherence and outcome in a sample of drug-using adolescents who received brief strategic family therapy within a multisite study. Measures utilized were the BSFT Therapist Adherence Form, the Clinical Supervision Checklist. the SureStep Drug Screen Card 10A, the Parenting Practices Questionnaire, the Family Environmental Scales. The Brief Strategic Family Therapist treatment was compared to treatment as usual. Therapists were also randomly assigned to treatment condition within agencies. Results supported the proposed factor structure of the adherence measure, providing evidence that it is possible to capture and discriminate between distinct dimensions of family therapy. Results also showed that over time therapist adherence was associated with engagement and retention in treatment, improvements in family functioning, and reductions in adolescent drug use. Limitations results can only be generalized to therapists from community agencies that participate in weekly group supervision Sessions, measures included in this study were designed to tap various aspects of the BSFT intervention, and are specific to the BSFT model, and the measure may be limited in identifying more complex and clinically sophisticated interventions that reflect overall competence.

Length of postintervention follow-up: Not specified.

Horigian, V. E., Feaster, D. J., Brincks, A., Robbins, M. S., Perez, M. A., & Szapocznik, J. (2015). The effects of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) on parent substance use and the association between parent and adolescent substance use. Addictive Behaviors, 42, 44-50.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — Adolescents: Mean=15.47 years, Parents: Mean=43 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adolescents: 44% Hispanic, 31% Caucasian, and 23% African American, and 9% Other; Parents: Not specified
  • Gender — Adolescents: 79% Male and 21% Female, Parents: 85% Female and15% Male
  • Status — Participants were parents and adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers.

Location/Institution: Not specified

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study is a secondary analysis to determine the effects of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) on parent substance use, and the relationship between parent substance use and adolescent substance use. This paper uses data from the BSFT effectiveness study conducted in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Participants were randomized to BSFT or treatment as usual (TAU) across eight outpatient treatment programs community treatment programs (CTPs) across the country. Adolescent substance use was assessed at baseline and at 12 monthly follow-up assessments. All additional adolescent and family assessments were completed at baseline and 4-, 8-, and 12-months postrandomization. Parent alcohol and drug use were assessed at baseline and at 12 months postrandomization. Measures utilized include the Alcohol and Drug Use items from the Addiction Severity Index-Lite (ASI), the Timeline Follow Back (TLFB), C-Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, Substance Abuse/Dependence Module (DISC-SA), Parenting Practices Questionnaire, and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Predictive Scales (DISC-PS). Results found parents in BSFT significantly decreased their alcohol use as measured by the ASI composite score from baseline to 12 months. Change in family functioning mediated the relationship between treatment condition and change in parent alcohol use. Children of parents who reported drug use at baseline had three times as many days of reported substance use at baseline compared with children of parents who did not use or only used alcohol. Adolescents of parents who used drugs at baseline in the BSFT group had a significantly lower trajectory of substance use than adolescents in the TAU group. Limitations include the study only assessed parents at baseline and at 12 months postrandomization, only allowing a pre-post examination, high attrition rate, and TAU consisted of an array of services, including nonmanualized family therapy.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 9 months.

References

Santisteban, D., Suarez-Morales, L., Robbins, M., & Szapocznik, J. (2006). Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Lessons learned in efficacy research and challenges to blending research and practice. Family Process, 45(2), 259-271.

Szapocznik, J., Hervis, O., & Schwartz, S. (2003). Therapy manuals for drug addiction. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for adolescent drug use. (NIH Publication Number 03-4751), Washington DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from www.drugabuse.gov/pdf/Manual5.pdf

Contact Information

Name: Jose Szapocznik, Ph.D.
Agency/Affiliation: University of Miami Brief Strategic Family Therapy® Institute
Website: www.bsft.org
Email:
Phone: (305) 243-7585
Name: Olga Hervis, MSW, LCSW
Agency/Affiliation: Family Therapy Training Institute of Miami
Website: www.bsft-av.com
Email:
Phone: (888) 527-3828

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: July 2015

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: February 2017

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2010