Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI)

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Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
High
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI) has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Trauma Treatment - Client-Level Interventions (Child & Adolescent).

Target Population: Children ages 7-18 recently exposed to a potentially traumatic event, or having recently disclosed physical or sexual abuse, and endorsing at least one symptom of posttraumatic stress

For children/adolescents ages: 7 – 18

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 7 – 18

Brief Description

CFTSI is a brief early intervention model for children and adolescents 7-18 that is implemented soon after exposure to a potentially traumatic event, or in the wake of disclosure of physical and sexual abuse. Developed at the Yale Child Study Center, CFTSI fills a gap between acute responses/crisis intervention and evidence-based, longer-term treatments designed to address traumatic stress symptoms and disorders that have become established. The goal of this family-strengthening model is to improve the caregiver’s ability to respond to, and support, a child who has endorsed at least one posttraumatic symptom. By raising awareness of the child’s symptoms, increasing communication and providing skills to help master trauma reactions, CFTSI aims to reduce symptoms and prevent onset of posttraumatic stress distorder (PTSD). In addition, CFTSI offers an opportunity to assess which children and families need longer-term treatment. CFTSI is provided by master’s-level clinicians who have been trained by CFTSI master trainers.


Program Goals:

The goals of Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI) are:

  • Improve screening and identification of children impacted by traumatic stress
  • Reduce posttraumatic stress symptoms
  • Enhance emotional support through increased caregiver-child communication
  • Teach/practice coping skills to reduce trauma reactions
  • Identify and address concrete external stressors (such as safety, legal issues, medical care)
  • Assess child’s need for longer-term treatment

Contact Information

Name: Hilary Hahn, MPH, EdM
Agency/Affiliation: Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Center
Email:
Phone: (203) 737-6304
Name: Carrie Epstien
Title: Director of Training
Agency/Affiliation: Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Center
Email:

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: December 2015

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: October 2012

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: October 2012