Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT)

Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) has been rated by the CEBC in the areas of: Disruptive Behavior Treatment (Child & Adolescent), Parent Training Programs that Address Behavior Problems in Children and Adolescents and Attachment Interventions (Child & Adolescent).

Target Population: Parents of children ages 3- 8 with behavioral, emotional, social, or attachment disorders

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 3 – 8

Brief Description

Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) is a play therapy-based treatment program for young children presenting with behavioral, emotional, social, and attachment disorders. CPRT is a systemic intervention grounded in Child-Centered Play Therapy (CCPT) theory, attachment principles, and interpersonal neurobiology. CPRT is based on the premise that a secure parent-child relationship is the essential factor for a child’s well-being. In a supportive group environment, parents learn skills to respond more effectively to their children’s emotional and behavioral needs. In turn, children learn that they can count on their parents to reliably and consistently meet their needs for love, acceptance, safety, and security. In CPRT, parents are taught specific skills grounded in the principles and procedures of CCPT that focus on establishing or enhancing a secure attachment with their child and helping parents attune to and respond to their child’s underlying needs rather than focus on symptoms. Parents learn to limit their children’s problem behavior, while demonstrating empathy and respect for their children.

Program Goals:

The goals of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) are

  • Enhance the caregiver-child relationship to increase trust, security, and closeness between the dyad and ultimately between other family members
  • Improve communication within the parent-child relationship
  • Increase problem-solving strategies within the parent-child relationship
  • Increase expressions of affection and familial enjoyment within the parent-child relationship
  • Increase parental acceptance and empathy
  • Improve parent’s ability to attune and respond sensitively to their children’s emotional needs
  • Help parents develop more realistic developmental expectations and limits on their children’s behavior
  • Increase overall confidence and self-acceptance as parents
  • Increase the child’s expression of their needs and feelings
  • Increase more appropriate and satisfying ways for the child to express, regulate, and meet their needs

Essential Components

The essential components of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) include:

  • Treatment components
    • Group format: CPRT uses a small, supportive group format with 5-8 parents weaving together education and supervision experiences. This dynamic and interactive group process distinguishes CPRT and other group filial/family therapy models from other parent training programs which tend to be primarily educational in focus. The CPRT group format requires a careful balance of didactic and support group components aimed at maximizing parents’ success in learning and applying the CPRT skills. During the group process component of CPRT, the therapist facilitates connections between parents and creates an environment of safety and acceptance.
    • At home, video-recorded parent-child play sessions: During at-home video-recorded special play times, parents set up a specific group of toys in a designated area of their home and conduct weekly, child-led play sessions in which they apply CCPT attitudes and skills aimed at fostering a more attuned and empathic parent-child relationship. Promoting secure attachment relationships between parents and children through the weekly play sessions is central to the success of CPRT.
    • Supervision of video-recorded parent-child play sessions is one of the most critical elements of the CPRT model. Parents receive feedback from the therapist and group members about their interactions with their child on the video-recording of the required 30-minute play session. Sensitive support of parents’ emotional needs is essential to the supervision process of CPRT.
  • Session structure
    • Session 1-3: Learning CPRT Principles and Skills
      • Establishment of an atmosphere of safety, acceptance, and encouragement is the top priority of the therapist in sessions 1-3, especially for this population of parents who need opportunities to share and normalize their experiences.
      • The therapist must be mindful of balancing parents’ need for support with teaching the foundational CCPT attitudes and skills in preparation for parents to begin their play sessions with their child after week 3.
      • Demonstration and role-play of skills are critical to ensure success in skill attainment, including following the child’s lead, reflection of feelings, and reflection of verbal and nonverbal content of child’s play.
      • Parents are taught that during the weekly 30-minute special playtime with their child, they are to focus their full attention and convey a genuine interest in and acceptance of their child by communicating the four “Be-With” attitudes:
        • I am here
        • I hear you
        • I understand
        • I care
        • This attitude and expression of acceptance on the parents’ part is at the core of developing a closer and more secure parent-child bond and facilitating healing within the child

    • Sessions 4-10: Group Process of Supervised Play Sessions
      • Skill refinement through supervision and processing of parent-child play sessions is the major activity in sessions 4 through 10.
      • Each week, two parents are selected to bring videorecordings of their at-home play sessions to group.
      • Each session begins with parents sharing their experiences during the special playtimes with their children. The majority of time spent is viewing the videorecordings and giving feedback to the two parents of focus for the week. The use of video playback holds parents accountable, facilitates greater insight as parents view themselves, provides more opportunities for vicarious learning, allows parents to see the impact of the play session on their children, and permits the therapist to reinforce skills demonstrated and suggest alternative responses and actions when needed.
      • Perhaps more important, viewing play sessions within the group format permits the therapist to offer parents support and encouragement in a more concrete and meaningful manner, while also providing opportunities to build group cohesion as parents are able to share their struggles and receive support from other parents.
      • In sessions 4 through 8, foundational skills continue to be emphasized, along with the added skills of limit setting, choice-giving, encouragement, and self-esteem-building responses.
      • To ensure success during this practice phase, parents are restricted to practicing the CCPT skills only during the weekly 30-minute play sessions, thus avoiding feelings of failure that inevitably arise when parents try to apply their new skills too quickly to daily problems that arise. In the final two sessions, parents are helped to generalize and apply their new skills to everyday interactions with their children.

Parent/Caregiver Services

Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Parents of children who experience lack of attachment to parent, disruptive behaviors, and internalizing behavior problems, stress in the parent-child relationship, parents who are struggling to communicate acceptance and empathy to their children
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: Although parents are typically the recipient of CPRT, grandparents and other caregivers are encouraged to attend.

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Community Agency
  • Hospital
  • Outpatient Clinic
  • School

Homework

Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) includes a homework component:

Simple and concise homework assignments (handouts/worksheets, relationship building activities, parenting skills, and self-reflective journals) are given weekly to reinforce the teaching points made each sessions. Homework assignments are intended to be brief and relational. After the third session, parents complete a weekly 30-minute video-recorded special playtime with their child.

Languages

Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) has materials available in languages other than English:

Chinese, Korean, Mandarin, Spanish

For information on which materials are available in these languages, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

Space for up to 10 people (including facilitators) to meet, trained facilitators, program materials, toy kits for demonstration and role-play, and video playback equipment

Minimum Provider Qualifications

Licensed mental health provider (or co-leaders) who has received extensive training in Child-Centered Play Therapy principles and training and supervision in CPRT which can include approved university coursework or postgraduate certification in CPRT

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program, and there is training available for this program.

Training Contacts:
Training is obtained:

Onsite, online, video; local, regional, and international. The Center for Play Therapy provides ongoing training in CPRT through annual workshops and conferences. Professionals must complete CPRT 101: Foundations in CPRT (12 hours) AND CPRT 102: Advanced CPRT Practice and Application (12 hours), followed by conducting three groups under supervision by an approved CPRT Supervisor. Professionals who complete all training requirements and hold a mental health license are eligible to apply to become a Certified Child-Parent Relationship Therapist.

Number of days/hours:

4 days/ 6 hrs. per day for a total of 24 hours

Additional Resources:

There currently are additional qualified resources for training:

There is a list of upcoming trainings at http://cpt.unt.edu/trainings-and-conferences.

Implementation Information

Since Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) is rated on the Scientific Rating Scale, information was requested from the program representative on available pre-implementation assessments, implementation tools, and/or fidelity measures.

Show implementation information...

Pre-Implementation Materials

There are no pre-implementation materials to measure organizational or provider readiness for Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT).

Formal Support for Implementation

There is no formal support available for implementation of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT).

Fidelity Measures

There are fidelity measures for Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) as listed below:

CPRT Therapist Skills-Protocol Checklist (CPRT-TSPC) to ensure fidelity of intervention protocol for training and research purposes which is available through University of North Texas Center for Play Therapy, 940-565-3864; cpt.unt.edu)

Implementation Guides or Manuals

There are implementation guides or manuals for Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) as listed below:

The CPRT Treatment Manual includes an easy to follow protocol for Sessions 1-10 of the CPRT model and included a CD-Rom of resources for implementation. Implementation guidelines are found in the textbook and manual. Both are available at The Center for Play Therapy, cpt.unt.edu or 940.565.3864.

Text and Treatment Manual:

Landreth, G. & Bratton, S. (2006). Child-parent relationship therapy (CPRT): A 10-session filial therapy model. New York: Bruner-Routledge Publishing. (Available through Routledge Publishers and University of North Texas Center for Play Therapy, 940-565-3864; cpt.unt.edu)

Bratton, S., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R., (2006). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10 session filial therapy model for training parents. New York, NY: Routledge. (Available through Routledge Publishers and University of North Texas Center for Play Therapy, 940-565-3864; cpt.unt.edu)

*Training manual includes a CD-ROM with printable handouts, worksheets, and resources for therapists and parents. Upon receipt of training manual, therapists are granted permission to copy and reproduce CPRT materials for parents, thus no further expenses for therapists or parents to repeatedly implement the program. 

Treatment Manual—Spanish Version: Bratton, S., Landreth, G. L., & Ceballos, P. (2014). Child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) parent notebook—Spanish version. [CD ROM]. New York, NY: Routledge. (Available through Routledge Publishers and University of North Texas Center for Play Therapy, 940-565-3864 cpt.unt.edu)

Research on How to Implement the Program

Research has not been conducted on how to implement Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT).

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program is rated a "3 - Promising Research Evidence" on the Scientific Rating Scale based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The practice must have at least one study utilizing some form of control (e.g., untreated group, placebo group, matched wait list study) establishing the practice's benefit over the placebo, or found it to be comparable to or better than an appropriate comparison practice. Please see the Scientific Rating Scale for more information.

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Show relevant research...

Bratton, S., & Landreth, G. (1995). Filial therapy with single parents: Effects on parental acceptance, empathy, and stress. International Journal of Play Therapy, 4(1), 61-80. doi:10.1037/h0089142

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 43 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: 19-47 years (Mean=29 years), Children: 3-7 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults: 90% Caucasian, 5% Hispanic, and 5% Other; Children: Not specified
  • Gender — Adults: 39 Female and 4 Male, Children: 24 Male and 19 Female
  • Status — Participants were recruited via fliers and newspaper.

Location/Institution: Not specified

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of filial therapy [now called Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT)] as a method of prevention and intervention for single parents and their children. The investigator randomly assigned parents to the experimental group (n=22) and the control group (n=21). Measures utilized include the Porter Parental Acceptance Scale, the Parenting Stress Index, the Filial Problem Checklist, and the Measurement of Empathy in Adult-Child Interactions. Results indicate when compared to the control group, the filial therapy/CPRT group demonstrated statistically significant improvement on all measures including child behavior problems, parental acceptance, parent-child relationship stress, and parental empathy. Limitations include small sample size and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Harris, Z. L., & Landreth, G. L. (1997). Filial therapy with incarcerated mothers: A five week model. International Journal of Play Therapy, 6(2), 53-73. doi:10.1037/h0089408

Type of Study: Pretest-posttest with control group
Number of Participants: 22 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: 22-45 years (Mean=32 years), Children: 3-10 years (Mean=7.3 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults: 50% Caucasian, 41% African-American, 5% Native American, and 5% Hispanic; Children: Not specified
  • Gender — Adults: 100% Female, Children: 53% Male and 47% Female
  • Status — Participants were incarcerated mothers.

Location/Institution: Not specified

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intensive filial therapy [now called Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT] as an intervention for incarcerated mothers as a method of increasing empathic behaviors with their children, increasing attitudes of acceptance toward their children, and reducing stress related to parenting. Participants who met the specified criteria were selected to participate in the study and were assigned to a control group or an experimental group according to their work or school schedule. Only the experimental group received treatment. Measures utilized include the Measurement of Empathy in Adult-Child Interactions Scale (MEACI), the Porter Parental Acceptance Scale (PPAS), the Parenting Stress Index (PSI), and the Filial Problem Checklist (FPC). Results indicated, when compared to the control group, incarcerated mothers in the filial therapy group increased their ability to recognize and communicate acceptance of their children's feelings and behaviors, to accept their children's needs for autonomy and independence, and to allow their children opportunities to learn self-directed behaviors. This model is also effective in reducing problematic behaviors of children of incarcerated mothers, as observed by the mothers. Limitations include small sample size, lack of randomization, generalizability due to composition of participants, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Landreth, G. L., & Lobaugh, A. F. (1998). Filial therapy with incarcerated fathers: Effects on parental acceptance of child, parental stress and child adjustment. Journal of Counseling and Development, 76, 157-165. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.1998.tb02388.x

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 32 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: 22-46 years, Children: 4-9 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults:52% Caucasian, 30% Hispanic, and 18% African American: Children: Not specified
  • Gender — Adults: 100% Male, Children: 19 Male and 13 Female
  • Status — Participants were incarcerated fathers and their children.

Location/Institution: Not specified

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intensive filial therapy [now called Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT)] as an intervention for incarcerated fathers. Participants were randomly selected for the experimental group or control group. Measures utilized include the Porter Parental Acceptance Scale (PPAS), the Parenting Stress Index (PSI), the Filial Problem Checklist (FPC) and the Joseph Preschool and Primary Self-Concept Scale (JSCS). Results indicated that compared to the control group, the CPRT group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in parental acceptance, parental stress, child behavior problems, and empathic interaction with their children. Limitations include small sample size, generalizability to other populations, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Yuen, T., Landreth, G., & Baggerly, J. (2002). Filial therapy with immigrant Chinese families. International Journal of Play Therapy, 11(2), 63-90. doi:10.1037/h0088865

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 35 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: 36-45 years, Children: 3-10 years (Mean=7.3 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — 100% Chinese
  • Gender — Adults: 26 Female and 9 Male, Children: 19 Male and 16 female
  • Status — Participants were immigrant Chinese parents and their children in a large metropolitan area.

Location/Institution: Vancouver, Canada

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intensive filial therapy [now called Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT)] as an intervention for immigrant Chinese families. Eighteen of these parents were randomly selected for the filial therapy group and divided into two training groups with 9 parents in each group. The other 17 parents were placed in the control group and received no treatment. Measures utilized include the Porter Parental Acceptance Scale (PPAS), the Parenting Stress Index (PSI), the Filial Problem Checklist (FPC), the Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC), and the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance for Young Children (PSPCSAYC). Results indicated indicate when compared to the control group, the CPRT group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in child behavior problems, child self-concept, parental acceptance, parental stress, and parental empathy. Limitations include small sample size, generalizability due to ethnic composition of participants, reliance on self-reported measures, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Smith, N., & Landreth, G. (2003). Intensive filial therapy with child witnesses of domestic violence: A comparison with individual and sibling group play therapy. International Journal of Play Therapy, 12(1), 67-88. doi:10.1037/h0088872

Type of Study: Pretest-posttest comparison group
Number of Participants: 44

Population:

  • Age — Adults: Not specified, Children: 4-10 years (Mean=6.1 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults:100% African American; Children: 40% African American, 39% Caucasian, 17% Hispanic, and 4% Other
  • Gender — Adults: 100% Female, Children: 23 Female and 20 Male
  • Status — Participants were mothers and their children of domestic violence incidents.

Location/Institution: Domestic violence and homeless shelters

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intensive filial therapy [now called Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT)] as a method of intervention with child witnesses of domestic violence. Participants were assigned to either the experimental CPRT group (n=11), wait list control group (n=11), intensive individual play therapy group (n=11), or intensive sibling group play therapy group (n=10). Measures utilized include the Joseph Preschool and Primary Self-Concept Screening Test (JSCS), the Measurement of Empathy in Adult-Child Interaction (MEACI), and the Child Behavior Checklist-Parent Version (CBCL). Results revealed that compared to the wait list control group, the CPRT group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in child behavior problems, child self-concept, parental acceptance, and parental empathy. Results indicated no statistically significant difference on any measure between the CPRT group and the two play therapy intervention groups. Limitations include small sample size and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Lee, M., & Landreth, G. (2003). Filial therapy with immigrant Korean parents in the United States. International Journal of Play Therapy, 12(2), 67-85. doi:10.1037/h0088879

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 32 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: 30-45 years, Children: 2-10 years (Mean=7.3 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — 100% Korean
  • Gender — Adults: 100% Female, Children: 17 Male and 15 Female
  • Status — Participants were immigrant Korean parents in a large metropolitan area.

Location/Institution: United States

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the 10-session filial therapy model [now called Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT)] as an intervention for immigrant Korean parents. Parents were randomly assigned to the CPRT group or the wait list control. Measures utilized include the Porter Parental Acceptance Scale (PPAS), the Parenting Stress Index (PSI), and the Measurement of Empathy in Adult-Child Interaction (MEACI). Results indicated that compared to the control group, the CPRT group demonstrated statistically significant improvement in parent-child relationship stress, parental acceptance and parental empathy. Limitations include small sample size, generalizability due to ethnic composition of participants, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Sheely-Moore, A., & Bratton, S. (2010). A strengths-based parenting intervention with low-income African American families. Professional School Counseling, 13(3), 175-183. doi:10.5330/PSC.n.2010-13.175

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 23 parent-child dyads completed the study

Population:

  • Age — Adults: Not specified, Children: Mean=4.2 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults: 100% African American, Children: 100% African American
  • Gender — Adults: Not specified, Children: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were parents and children recruited from Head Start.

Location/Institution: Southwestern region of the United States

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study investigated the effects of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) for African American families. Parents were assigned to the experimental CPRT group or the waitlist control group through random assignment. Measures included the Parenting Stress Index Form (PSI), and the Child Behavior Checklist-Parent Version (CBCL). Results indicate when compared to the control group, CPRT yielded statistically significant reductions in total behavior problems and parent-child relationship stress. And the treatment effects were large. Limitations include small sample size, lack of true random assignment, reliance on self-reported measures, no-treatment control group, generalizability due to ethnic composition of participants, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Ceballos, P. L., & Bratton, S. C. (2010). Empowering Latino families: Effects of a culturally responsive intervention for low‐income immigrant Latino parents on children's behaviors and parental stress. Psychology in the Schools, 47(8), 761-775. doi:10.1002/pits.20502

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 48 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: Mean=29 years, Children: Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults: 83% Mexicans, and 17% South or Central American; Children: 47% European American, 15% Latino, 9% Black American, and 18% Other
  • Gender — Adults: 47 Female and 1 Male, Children: 27 Male and 21 Female
  • Status — Participants were from One Head Start school and one Title 1 elementary school.

Location/Institution: One Head Start school and one Title I elementary school in the Southwestern region of the United States

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examined the effectiveness of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) in school settings with low-income Latino immigrant parents whose children were identified with behavioral concerns. Participants were randomly assigned by school site to the CPRT group or to the no-treatment control group. Measures utilized include the Parent Stress Index – Spanish Version (PSI), and the Child Behavior Checklist Spanish version (CBCL). Results indicate that parents who participated in CPRT reported statistically significant decreases in child behavior problems and parent child relationship stress when compared to the control group. Limitations include generalization of results which is limited to a sample of a Latino families residing in a southwestern U.S. metropolitan area, small sample size, no-treatment control group, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Carnes‐Holt, K., & Bratton, S. C. (2014). The efficacy of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy for adopted children with attachment disruptions. Journal of Counseling & Development, 92(3), 328-337. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.2014.00160.x

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 61 parent-child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Adults: 19-47 years (Mean=29 years), Children: 2-10 years old (Mean=5.8 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adults: 88.5% European American, 5% Hispanic, and 5% Other; Children: 47% European American, 15% Latino, 9% Black American, and 18% Other
  • Gender — Adults: 39 Female and 22 Male, Children: 24 Male and 19 Female
  • Status — Participants were adoptive parents.

Location/Institution: Southwestern U.S. metropolitan area.

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This pilot study examined the effectiveness of Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) with adoptive families. Parents participating with their spouse/partner (n = 23 pairs) were randomly assigned as a unit, and single parents or individuals participating without their partner/spouse (n = 15) were randomly assigned to the CPRT or wait list control groups Measures included the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Measurement of Empathy in Adult-Child Interaction (MEACI). Results indicate that compared to the control group CPRT demonstrated statistically significant improvement in child behavior problems and parental empathy. Limitations include generalization of results which is limited to a sample of adoptive families residing in a southwestern U.S. metropolitan area, small sample size, the use of only one source of measurement to assess behavioral change in the child, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

References

Bratton, S., Landreth, G. L., Kellam, T., & Blackard, S. R., (2006). Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT) treatment manual: A 10 session filial therapy model for training parents. New York, NY: Routledge.

Bratton S. C., Opiola K., & Dafoe E. (2015). Child–parent relationship therapy: A 10-session filial therapy model. In Crenshaw D. A., Stewart A. L. (Eds.), Play therapy: A comprehensive guide to theory and practice (pp. 129–140). New York, NY: Guilford.

Landreth, G., & Bratton, S. (2006). Child-Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT): A 10-session filial therapy model. New York: Bruner-Routledge Publishing.

Contact Information

Name: Sue Bratton, PhD, LPC-S, RPT-S
Agency/Affiliation: Center for Play Therapy, University of North Texas
Website: cpt.unt.edu
Email:
Phone: (940) 565-3864
Fax: (940) 565-4461

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: March 2017

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: August 2017

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: September 2017