Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI)

Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Domestic/Intimate Partner Violence: Services for Victims and their Children.

Target Population: Families with children from birth to 18 years old living in home that have reported incidents of intimate partner violence (IPV) to police

For children/adolescents ages: 0 – 17

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 0 – 17

Brief Description

The DVHVI is a joint project of the Yale Child Study Center and the New Haven Police Department. The project provides enhanced law enforcement, community-based advocacy, and mental health services to families affected by domestic violence, in an effort to increase children’s safety and decrease negative psychological effects of exposure to domestic violence. The project conducts outreach home visits by teams of advocates and patrol officers. At the initial home visit, the team and non-offending parent identify issues affecting family safety. The team provides information related to judicial processes, available community resources, and children’s responses to violence and trauma. Ongoing intervention, including referrals for child-focused clinical treatment, is determined by the unique needs of each family.

Program Goals:

The program representative did not provide information about the program’s goals.

Essential Components

The essential components of the Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) include:

  • Home visits conducted by team including police officer and advocate or clinician
  • Home visit outreach conducted as soon as possible following interpersonal violence (IPV) incident reported to police
  • Safety assessment conducted by team at initial visit
  • Specific safety plan jointly created by team and parent at initial visit
  • Explanation of relevant criminal justice process provided at initial visit, including court orders of protection
  • Information on available community services provided at initial visit
  • Psychoeducation about children’s responses to IPV provided at initial visit
  • Trauma symptom screening for all children, based on parent report, conducted at initial visit
  • Individualized service plans developed based on the needs and wishes of each family
  • Referrals to child-focused clinical evaluations given at initial visit
  • Symptomatic children referred to Childhood Violent Trauma Clinic for evaluation and appropriate treatment (Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention [CFTSI], Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy [TF-CBT], Child-Parent Psychotherapy [CPP], or other long-term treatment)
  • Ongoing advocacy and case management for families that require assistance in implementing safety plans provided during follow-up visits

Child/Adolescent Services

Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Trauma-related symptoms

Parent/Caregiver Services

Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Parent experiencing IPV with children from birth to 18 years old living in the home

Delivery Setting

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Birth Family Home

Homework

This program does not include a homework component.

Languages

Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) does not have materials available in a language other than English.

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

  • Support for program from police and clinical agency leadership
  • Police officers to identify cases of IPV in families with children and to conduct home visits with program advocates (number of officers and time required depends on size of community or district where the program is implemented and specific case characteristics identified as referral criteria (e.g., level of violence))
  • Advocate(s) to conduct home visits (number of staff depends on scope of program as with police)
  • Clinical supervisor to administer and direct program and supervise advocate(s)
  • Access to clinical resources for referral of symptomatic children
  • Support staff to enter and maintain client information in database

Minimum Provider Qualifications

Advocates must have knowledge of domestic violence dynamics; principles of child development and children's response to trauma; relevant local resources for legal services; basic needs; and social support. Advocates need not have advanced degree. Clinical supervisor must have at least a Master's of Social Work (MSW) degree and must have knowledge and experience in working with battered women, traumatized children, clinical case management, and knowledge of community resources. Police must have basic knowledge of domestic violence dynamics and good understanding of relevant judicial processes in the jurisdiction.

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program, and there is training available for this program.

Training Contact:
  • Colleen Vadala
    National Center for Children Exposed to Violence, Yale Child Study Center

    phone: (203) 785-2975
    230 South Frontage Rd.
    New Haven, CT 06520-7900
Training is obtained:

Initial training in the program is provided at the National Center for Children Exposed to Violence in New Haven, CT. Follow-up consultation is provided by phone and e-mail, with site visits to the new site arranged as the new program develops.

Number of days/hours:

For those communities that have existing police-mental health partnerships based on the Child Development-Community Policing (CD-CP) program model, training in this program as an additional component takes place in a 1- day seminar, followed by site-specific consultation. For communities where there is no existing partnership program between police and a mental health agency, training in the CDCP model takes place in phases (initial visit to New Haven by replication site team; site visit to the new site by CDCP team; 4-day training in New Haven with observations and police ride-alongs; ongoing consultation for program development).

Implementation Information

Since Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) is rated on the Scientific Rating Scale, information was requested from the program representative on available pre-implementation assessments, implementation tools, and/or fidelity measures.

Show implementation information...

Pre-Implementation Materials

The program representative did not provide information about pre-implementation materials.

Formal Support for Implementation

The program representative did not provide information about formal support for implementation of Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI).

Fidelity Measures

The program representative did not provide information about fidelity measures of Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI).

Implementation Guides or Manuals

The program representative did not provide information about implementation guides or manuals for Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI).

Research on How to Implement the Program

The program representative did not provide information about research conducted on how to implement Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI).

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program is rated a "3 - Promising Research Evidence" on the Scientific Rating Scale based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The practice must have at least one study utilizing some form of control (e.g., untreated group, placebo group, matched wait list study) establishing the practice's benefit over the placebo, or found it to be comparable to or better than an appropriate comparison practice. Please see the Scientific Rating Scale for more information.

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Show relevant research...

Stover, C. S., Poole, G., & Marans, S. (2009). The Domestic Violence Home-Visit Intervention: Impact on police-reported incidents of repeat violence over 12 months. Violence and Victims, 24(5), 591-606.

Type of Study: Posttest only design with nonequivalent groups
Number of Participants: 512

Population:

  • Age — 15-63 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 53% African American, 30% Hispanic, and 17% Caucasian
  • Gender — 100% Female
  • Status — Participants were women seeking emergency services who had participated in the Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI).

Location/Institution: New Haven, Connecticut

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The study evaluated the effectiveness of Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) in engaging a sample of women experiencing domestic violence. Clinical and police record data were collected and repeat calls to the police were tracked for 12 months. The sample was divided into four groups: high-dosage (women who received more than 20 minutes total during police home-visits), low-dosage (less than 20 minutes total), no-contact (women who were targeted to receive the intervention, but no contact was made), and a nontreatment control group (women who lived in the designated police districts, but for whom no attempts for service were made). Analyses revealed that women who engaged with the DVHVI were more likely to contact the police for subsequent events than those who received no or minimal DVHVI contact. Hispanic women served by Spanish-speaking advocate-officer teams were the most likely to utilize services and call the police for subsequent incidents. Limitations included lack of randomization, lack of assessment measures to evaluate participants, and the median length of intervention was limited (many women participated for 20 minutes or less in the intervention).

Length of postintervention follow-up: 1 year.

Stover, C. S., Berkman, M., Desai, R., & Marans, S. (2010). The efficacy of a police-advocacy intervention for victims of domestic violence: 12-month follow-up data. Violence Against Women, 16(4), 410-425.

Type of Study: Pretest-posttest control group design
Number of Participants: 107

Population:

  • Age — Mean=30 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 54% African American, 28% Hispanic, 13% Caucasian, and 5% Other
  • Gender — 100% Female
  • Status — Participants were women seeking emergency services who had participated in the Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI).

Location/Institution: New Haven, Connecticut

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The study evaluated the effectiveness of Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention (DVHVI) in engaging a sample of women experiencing domestic violence. Women were divided into an intervention or control group and interviewed at 1, 6, and 12 months following a police reported domestic incident to assess repeat violence, service utilization, and symptoms. Measures used included the Conflict-Tactics Scale-Revised (CTS2), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Posttraumatic Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), Traumatic Events Screening Inventory including the Parent Report Revised version (TESI; TESI-PR), Resource Utilization Questionnaire (RUQ), Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the UCLA Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index-Parent Report Version (PTSD-RI). Results indicated that women who received the DVHVI were more satisfied with the police and likely to call them to report a nonphysical domestic dispute in the 12 months following the initial incident than women in the comparison group. DVHVI participants were significantly more likely to use court-based services and seek mental health treatment for their children. Limitations included the lack of randomization and concerns about the generalizability of the findings.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 1 year.

References

Berkman, M., Casey, R., Berkowitz, S., & Marans, S. (2004). Police in the lives of children exposed to domestic violence: collaborative approaches to intervention. In: Jaffe, Baker, & Cunningham (eds.) Ending domestic violence in the lives of children and parents. New York: Guilford Press.

Berkman, M., Stover, C. S., & Marans, S. (2007). Domestic violence home visit intervention project: Guidelines for police-advocate visits. New Haven, CT: National Center for Children Exposed to Violence.

Contact Information

Name: Colleen Vadala
Agency/Affiliation: National Center for Children Exposed to Violence
Department: Yale Child Study Center
Email:
Phone: (203) 785-2975
Fax: (203) 785-4608

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: July 2017

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: December 2015

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: January 2008