Generations of Hope

Scientific Rating:
NR
Not able to be Rated
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
High
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Generations of Hope has been reviewed by the CEBC in the area of: Kinship Caregiver Support Programs, but lacks the necessary research evidence to be given a Scientific Rating.

Target Population: Vulnerable populations such as foster/adopted children, aging out foster youth, women ages 21-25 years that were foster children and have children, families of wounded warriors, and older youth challenged by autism or behavioral and developmental disabilities

For children/adolescents ages: 0 – 21

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 0 – 21

Brief Description

Generations of Hope develops and helps operate intergenerational communities of up to 150 people. Of these about 70% are seniors and the remainder families and vulnerable populations. Affordable housing is provided to seniors and in return they volunteer to support the foster families and children (or other populations). Support is given by mentoring, tutoring, socialization, and joint activities. The program is staffed by a small staff that works with all groups to increase and improve interaction. The impact of this programming is designed to augment any needed social, child welfare, and behavioral services.

Program Goals:

The goals of Generations of Hope are:

  • Provide a community that enables vulnerable populations to have a long-term relationship with seniors (55 years plus)
  • Enables vulnerable populations to live in a normal environment
  • Enable vulnerable populations to achieve normal developmental milestones and develop into positive young adults

Essential Components

The essential components of Generations of Hope include:

  • Construction or rehabilitation of affordable housing designed to intermix generations in purpose built housing; communities of up to 150 people
  • A centrally located community center that includes quiet and learning spaces as community gathering places for parties, food, and socialization
  • Staff that is trained to provide enough but not too much intervention to create a community social environment where the families and children help keep the seniors from isolation and the seniors help families maintain a noncrisis mode and provide opportunities for children to prosper
  • Staff that works with local professional and health provider agencies to assure that professional intervention is available when needed
  • Staff that works with all appropriate external professional services to develop any needed “care plan,” individualized education plan (IEP), or other targeted service
  • Staff that oversees the needs of seniors to assure adequate health care is delivered and the senior is a participant in staying healthy
  • Addressing family adult needs as the goal is to create and maintain a stable family:
    • Seniors and adults working together to tutor, mentor, and provide activities
    • Intermittent childcare and emergency childcare
    • Experiential lessons to help stabilize a family and mitigate crises in the family
    • Ride sharing and other transportation arrangements
    • Early warning attention to staff for problem solving

Child/Adolescent Services

Generations of Hope directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Living with a foster family or adopted from the foster care system, about to age out of the foster youth, challenged by autism or behavioral and developmental disabilities

Parent/Caregiver Services

Generations of Hope directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Foster parents or adopted a child out of foster care or are adults ages 21-25 years that were foster children and have children of their own
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: The Generations of Hope concept is that of a community. The individuals in the community are constantly involved with each other. Seniors may volunteer 10,000 to 15,000 hours a year to provide family and child support services.

Delivery Setting

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Residential Care Facility

Homework

This program does not include a homework component.

Languages

Generations of Hope does not have materials available in a language other than English.

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

Housing for up to 150 people, community building that serves as a dining hall and multipurpose room

Minimum Provider Qualifications

Staff should have at least a Bachelor’s lever degree with experience working with these populations

Education and Training Resources

There is not a manual that describes how to implement this program; but there is training available for this program.

Training Contact:
  • Tom Berkshire
    phone: (217) 381-9403
Training is obtained:

Generations of Hope provides a consulting service for training

Number of days/hours:

Relative to clients’ needs which vary from Operation, construction, fund raising, board development, screening in residents etc.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program has been reviewed and it was determined that this program lacks the type of published, peer-reviewed research that meets the CEBC criteria for a scientific rating of 1 – 5. Therefore, the program has been given the classification of "NR - Not able to be Rated." It was reviewed because it was identified by the topic expert as a program being used in the field, or it is being marketed and/or used in California with children receiving services from child welfare or related systems and their parents/caregivers. Some programs that are not rated may have published, peer-reviewed research that does not meet the above stated criteria or may have eligible studies that have not yet been published in the peer-reviewed literature. For more information on the "NR - Not able to be Rated" classification, please see the Scientific Rating Scale.

Child Welfare Outcomes: Not Specified

Show relevant research...

Eheart, B. K. & Power, M. B. (2001). From despair to care: A journey of the old and the young at Hope Meadows. Children and Youth Services Review, 23(9/10), 691-718. doi:10.1016/S0190-7409(01)00156-6

Type of Study: Case study
Number of Participants: 8

Population:

  • Age — Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were foster children at the Hope Meadows facility.

Location/Institution: Hope Meadows facility, Central Illinois

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The current study examined how living at Hope Meadows benefits both foster children and senior citizens. Random self-reports from the senior citizens detailed feeling better, improved health, and generally more positive outlooks on life. Results found Hope Meadows provided the seniors with a sense of safety and security and with meaningful relationships with people of all ages. Limitations include lack of generalizability due to ethnicity, self-reported measures, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Power, M. B., Eheart, B. K., Racine, D., & Karnik, N. S. (2007). Aging well in an intentional intergenerational community: Meaningful relationships and purposeful engagement. Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 5(2), 7-25. doi:10.1300/J194v05n02_02

Type of Study: Case study
Number of Participants: 2

Population:

  • Age — Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were foster children at the Hope Meadows facility.

Location/Institution: Hope Meadows facility, Central Illinois

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examined the health and well-being of the seniors at Hope Meadows. Random self-reports from the seniors detailed feeling better, improved health, and generally more positive outlooks on life. Limitations include nonrandomization of participants, lack of control group, small sample size, and lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

References

No reference materials are currently available for Generations of Hope.

Contact Information

Name: Tom Berkshire
Website: ghdc.generationsofhope.org
Email:

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: February 2017

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: January 2017

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: March 2017