Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C)

Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Anxiety Treatment (Child & Adolescent).

Target Population: Children ages 8- to 12-years old with anxiety or depression; can be modified for both younger and older children

For children/adolescents ages: 8 – 12

Brief Description

MBCT-C is a psychotherapy for anxious or depressed children adapted from MBCT for adults which has been rated by the CEBC in the Depression Treatment (Adult) topic area. The adult and child programs both combine mindfulness-based theory and practices with cognitively oriented interventions. The primary aim is to improve affective self-regulation through development of mindful attention and decentering from thoughts and emotions. Unlike cognitive therapy, no effort is made to restructure or change existing thoughts and emotions. The program consists of 12 weekly therapy sessions lasting 90-minutes, conducted individually or in small groups of 6-8 children. Activities are designed to be engaging and developmentally appropriate for children ages 8 to 12. Home-based practice activities aim to further develop skills learned in each session. Parents/caregivers are invited to attend two separate adult sessions. Written session summaries, handouts, and home practice schedules are provided at every session. These written materials encourage adults to participate in the home-based activities along with the child.

Program Goals:

The goals of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) are:

  • Enhance social-emotional resiliency
  • Promote positive changes in how the child relates to their own thoughts and emotions
  • Learn to distinguish thoughts that are judgmental from those that simply describe or note one’s experiences
  • Recognize that judgments often escalate mood disturbances, then mood disturbances can trigger maladaptive behaviors
  • Cultivate self-acceptance and acceptance of those things that cannot be changed
  • Expand awareness of personal emotional and behavioral choices

Essential Components

The essential components of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) include:

  • Unlike Cognitive Therapy, MBCT-C makes no attempt to change the content of negative thinking, instead encouraging children to change how they relate to their own thoughts, feelings, and body sensations. In this way, they have opportunities to discover that these are transient events in the mind and the body, with which they can choose to engage—or not to engage
  • Helps children realize that thoughts, feelings (emotions), and body sensations are “just” thoughts, feelings, and body sensations, rather than “truth” or “me” by having the therapist repeatedly notice and offer nonjudgmental observations, with interest and compassion
  • Helps children learn to see more clearly the patterns of the mind, and to recognize that falling into anxious overanalysis or depressive rumination is often fueled by strong emotions, which serves only to increase the child’s emotional and behavioral problems
  • Helps break associations between anxious or depressed moods and negative thinking
  • Helps children develop the capacity to allow distressing thoughts, feelings, and body sensations to come and go, without feeling that they have to suppress them, run away from them, or do battle with them
  • Teaches skills to help children stay in touch with the present moment, without feeling driven to dwell on the past or worry about the future
  • 12-week group therapy that consists of weekly 90-minute sessions plus home practice activities; treatment manual also provides suggestions for ways to adapt MBCT-C to use in individual therapy
  • Recommended group size is 6 to 8 children
  • Activities designed to be engaging and developmentally appropriate for children ages 8 to 12; adaptable for use with both younger and older children and for youth with special needs
  • Parents/caregivers invited to attend two separate adult sessions that offer detailed information about the program, experiential practice with mindfulness activities, and encouraged to join the child in doing the weekly home-practice activities
  • Unlike most therapies, session summaries, handouts, and home practice activities provided for every session and used to encourage parents/caregivers to understand the program aims and interventions, as well as allowing them to participate in home-based mindfulness activities with the child
  • Developmentally appropriate, child-friendly mindfulness activities include mindfulness of the breath, body scan, and yoga-like movement activities; mindfulness of thoughts, emotions, and body sensations; and sensory-based activities (i.e., visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, gustatory, and kinesthetic sensations)

Child/Adolescent Services

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Anxiety, posttraumatic distress, and/or depression, along with the cognitive and behavioral problems that result from these distressing moods
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: Parents/caregivers are invited (but not required) to attend two separate adult sessions that offer detailed information about the program, experiential practice with several mindfulness activities, and encouraged to join the child in doing the weekly home-practice activities.

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Outpatient Clinic
  • Residential Care Facility
  • School

Homework

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) includes a homework component:

Home-practice activities are an integral part of MBCT-C and considered necessary to achieve the aims of the program. On an ongoing basis (beyond the 12 weeks of the program), a few minutes of daily practice with MBCT-C activities is strongly recommended. Parents/caregivers are encouraged to practice the home-based activities with the child. To facilitate this, written session summaries, handouts, and home-practice assignments are provided at every session.

Languages

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) has materials available in languages other than English:

French, German

For information on which materials are available in these languages, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

Therapist trained to conduct MBCT-C, one group therapy room that accommodates up to 9-10 people (with sufficient floor space for one yoga mat per participant), carpeting -or- one yoga mat plus one chair or cushion per participant, miscellaneous (inexpensive) supplies suggested in the treatment manual and used during the sessions such as paper, drawing materials, common household objects (e.g., baggies, spices, and lotions), a few food items (e.g., one small box of raisins and one piece of fruit for each child)

Minimum Provider Qualifications

Master’s degree in psychology, social work, marriage and family counseling, or a related mental-health field; personal experience of mindfulness (i.e., a regular mindfulness practice) is strongly recommended; basic understanding of cognitive-behavioral principles is recommended, but not required

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program, and there is training available for this program.

Training Contact:
Training is obtained:

Group training workshops are offered at local, national, and international conferences. Information about upcoming lectures and workshops is available at https://www.sites.google.com/site/randyesemplephd

Individual training and consultation is available by arrangement. Email Dr. Semple at MBCTforChildren@gmail.com

Number of days/hours:

Half-day and full-day training workshops are available.

Additional Resources:

There currently are additional qualified resources for training:

Jennifer Lee, PhD, Clinical Psychologist
Phone: (626) 219-0085
Email: jennifer@jleephd.com
Location: Southern California

Richard Sears, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist
Center for Clinical Mindfulness
Phone: (513) 899-6463
Email: richard@psych-insights.com
Web: www.psych-insights.com
Location : Cincinnati, OH

Christina Luberto, PhD, Clinical Psychologist
Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts General Hospital
Phone: (617) 724-6300 ext. 111-134-1469
Email: cluberto@mgh.harvard.edu
Location: Boston, MA

M. Lee Freedman, MD, CM, FRCP(C), Psychiatrist
Email: mlfreedman@hotmail.com
Location: Toronto, Canada

Implementation Information

Since Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) is rated on the Scientific Rating Scale, information was requested from the program representative on available pre-implementation assessments, implementation tools, and/or fidelity measures.

Show implementation information...

Pre-Implementation Materials

There are pre-implementation materials to measure organizational or provider readiness for Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) as listed below:

The MBCT-C treatment manual is required reading prior to implementation:

Semple, R. J., & Lee, J. (2011). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxious children: A manual for treating childhood anxiety. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Both the book and the e-book are available through New Harbinger Publications (http://www.newharbinger.com/mindfulness-based-cognitive-therapy-anxious-children) and many other booksellers.

Formal Support for Implementation

There is formal support available for implementation of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) as listed below:

Dr. Semple and the other trainers listed here are available by arrangement for teleconference or onsite consultations and onsite support.

Fidelity Measures

There are fidelity measures for Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) as listed below:

  • Two program-specific evaluation questionnaires (one for parents and one for child participants) are included as Appendix D in the MBCT-C treatment manual. These are used to assess acceptability and satisfaction with the program. These are client self-report questionnaires that require no training to administer or score. Both evaluation questionnaires are included with this application.
  • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children Adherence Scale (MBCT-C-AS; Semple & Sears, 2014) is a 20-item measure of MBCT-C components that can be observer-rated or self-rated by the group therapist for each session. Response choices define evidence for the presence of each MBCT-C component on a three-point scale: “not at all,” “slight/inconsistent” or “clear/consistent.” The MBCT-C-AS has not yet been validated, although it was adapted from, and is very similar to, the adult MBCT Adherence Scale, which is a validated measure. This is a research measure of fidelity that requires understanding and experience with MBCT-C in order to complete the ratings. The MBCT-C-AS is included with this application.

All three of these measures are available free of charge by request. Email: MBCTforChildren@gmail.com

Implementation Guides or Manuals

There are implementation guides or manuals for Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) as listed below:

The thorough, session-by-session, treatment manual provides information on the theory, background, and development of MBCT-C, and about childhood anxiety. Logistical considerations for conducting the intervention, including screening for appropriate children, group composition, necessary resources, and parent involvement are provided. The second part of the book is a practical guide for therapists wishing to conduct MBCT-C groups with suggestions for conducting MBCT-C in individual therapy. The session-by-session guide includes detailed information on facilitating each of the 12 sessions. Appendices offer additional information and resources, printable session materials, and program questionnaires.

The MBCT-C manual in book format includes a CD-ROM containing printable PDF files of session summaries, handouts, and home practice activities for all 12 sessions.

The book is available through New Harbinger Publications (http://www.newharbinger.com/mindfulness-based-cognitive-therapy-anxious-children) and many other booksellers.

The MBCT-C manual in e-book format includes the same printable materials, which are available by download from the publisher’s website at http://nhpubs.com/7208.

Research on How to Implement the Program

Research has been conducted on how to implement Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) as listed below:

  • Semple, R. J., Reid, E. F., & Miller, L. (2005). Treating anxiety with mindfulness: An open trial of mindfulness training for anxious children. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 19, 379-392. doi:10.1891/jcop.2005.19.4.379
  • Lee, J., Semple, R. J., Rosa, D., & Miller, L. (2008). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children: Results of a pilot study. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 22, 15-28. doi:10.1891/0889.8391.22.1.15
  • Semple, R. J., Lee, J., Rosa, D., & Miller, L. F. (2010). A randomized trial of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children: Promoting mindful attention to enhance social-emotional resiliency in children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 19, 218-229. doi:10.1007/s10826-009-9301-y
  • Dehghani, F., Amiri, S., Molavi, H., & Neshat-Doost, H. T. (2014). Effectiveness of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy on female elementary students with generalized anxiety disorder. International Journal of Psychology and Behavioral Research, 3, 159-165.
  • Cotton, S., Luberto, C. M., Sears, R. W., Strawn, J. R., Stahl, L., Wasson, R. S., … Delbello, M. P. (2016). Mindfulness‐Based Cognitive Therapy for youth with anxiety disorders at risk for bipolar disorder: A pilot trial. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 10(5), 426-434. doi:10.1111/eip.12216
  • Strawn, J. R., Cotton, S., Luberto, C. M., Patino, L. R., Stahl, L. A., Weber, W. A., ... DelBello, M. P. (2016). Neural function before and after Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in anxious adolescents at risk for developing bipolar disorder. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 26(4), 372-379. doi:10.1089/cap.2015.0054
  • Abedini, S., Habibi, M., Semple, R. J., Dehghani, M., & Achenbach, T. (in press). The effectiveness of an adapted Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for internalizing and attention problems in children with cancer. Journal of Child and Family Studies.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program is rated a "3 - Promising Research Evidence" on the Scientific Rating Scale based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The practice must have at least one study utilizing some form of control (e.g., untreated group, placebo group, matched wait list study) establishing the practice's benefit over the placebo, or found it to be comparable to or better than an appropriate comparison practice. Please see the Scientific Rating Scale for more information.

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Show relevant research...

Semple, R. J., Reid, E. F., & Miller, L. (2005). Treating anxiety with mindfulness: An open trial of mindfulness training for anxious children. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 19, 379-392. doi:10.1891/jcop.2005.19.4.379

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial with matching
Number of Participants: 25

Population:

  • Age — 9-13 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 15 Latino, 7 African Americans, and 3 Caucasian
  • Gender — 17 Females and 8 Males
  • Status — Participants were children enrolled in the Teachers College Center for Educational and Psychological Services (CEPS) reading tutoring program.

Location/Institution: The Center for Educational and Psychological Services, Upper West Side, Harlem and Washington Heights, New York

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) with middle-school aged children. Participants were first matched by age and gender, and then randomly assigned to one of two groups. Measures utilized include the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests, 4th Edition. (GMRT), the Child Behavior Checklist: Parent Report Form (CBCL), the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC), Reynolds Child Depression Scale (RCDS), the Feely Faces Scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). Results indicated after participating in MBCT-C, parents reported significantly fewer CBCL attention problems at the end of treatment; these gains were maintained at the three-month follow-up. Although significant reductions in anxiety symptoms were reported by the end of the MBCT-C program, no significant differences between groups were found as well as the relationship between mindfulness and reading comprehension was not supported in this study. Overall, participants demonstrated improved reading comprehension but no significant group differences were found. Although some reductions in behavioral problems were reported over the course of the study for children in all groups, no significant between-group differences were found. Limitations include small sample size children did not meet diagnosis for anxiety disorder, lack of comparison group and length of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 3 months.

Lee, J., Semple, R. J., Rosa, D., & Miller, L. (2008). Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children: Results of a pilot study. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 22, 15-28. doi:10.1891/0889.8391.22.1.15

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial with matching (secondary analysis)
Number of Participants: 25

Population:

  • Age — 9-13 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 15 Latino, 7 African Americans, and 3 Caucasian
  • Gender — 17 Females and 8 Males
  • Status — Participants were children enrolled in the Teachers College Center for Educational and Psychological Services (CEPS) reading tutoring program.

Location/Institution: The Center for Educational and Psychological Services, Upper West Side, Harlem and Washington Heights, New York

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study utilized information from Semple et al. (2005). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and helpfulness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) for the treatment of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in a sample of nonreferred children. Participants were first matched by age and gender, and then randomly assigned to one of two groups. Measures utilized include the Child Behavior Checklist: Parent Report Form (CBCL), the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC), Reynolds Child Depression Scale (RCDS), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). Results indicated preliminary support for MBCT-C as helpful in reducing internalizing and externalizing symptoms within subjects on the parent report measure. The high attendance rate (Intent-to-Treat sample, 78%; Completer sample, 94%), high retention rate (68%), and positive ratings on program evaluations supported treatment feasibility and acceptability. Limitations include children did not meet diagnosis of anxiety disorder, small sample size, lack of comparison group, and length of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 3 months.

Semple, R. J., Lee, J., Rosa, D., & Miller, L. F. (2010). A randomized trial of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children: Promoting mindful attention to enhance social-emotional resiliency in children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 19, 218-229. doi:10.1007/s10826-009-9301-y

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial with matching
Number of Participants: 25

Population:

  • Age — 9-13 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 17 Latino, 6 African Americans, and 2 Caucasian
  • Gender — 15 Females and 10 Males
  • Status — Participants were children with anxiety or stress.

Location/Institution: Not stated

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The present study examined Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) in reducing (a) attention problems, (b) anxiety symptoms, and (c) behavior problems in children. Participants were first matched by age and gender, and then randomly assigned to one of four independent groups. Measures utilized include the Child Behavior Checklist: Parent Report Form (CBCL), the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC). Results indicated that participants who completed MBCT-C showed fewer attention problems than wait-listed controls and those improvements were maintained at three months following the intervention. Significant reductions in anxiety symptoms and behavior problems were found for those children who reported clinically elevated levels of anxiety at pretest. Limitations include small sample size, high dropout rate, and length of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 3 months.

Dehghani, F., Amiri, S., Molavi, H., & Neshat-Doost, H. T. (2014). Effectiveness of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy on female elementary students with generalized anxiety disorder. International Journal of Psychology and Behavioral Research, 3, 159-165.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 14

Population:

  • Age — 9 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — 100% Female
  • Status — Participants were children with generalized anxiety disorder.

Location/Institution: University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The present study examined Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) in reducing generalized anxiety in female elementary students. Participants were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (MBCT-C) and a control group. The experimental group participated in twelve 90-minute MBCT-C sessions and the control group received no intervention. Measures utilized include the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C) and the Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS). Results indicated that significant difference is observed between female elementary students of experimental and control groups at posttest phase in terms of worry and anxiety. Limitations include generalizability due to gender of participants and small sample size.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 2 months.

Cotton, S., Luberto, C. M., Sears, R. W., Strawn, J. R., Stahl, L., Wasson, R. S., … Delbello, M. P. (2016). Mindfulness‐Based Cognitive Therapy for youth with anxiety disorders at risk for bipolar disorder: A pilot trial. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 10(5), 426-434. doi:10.1111/eip.12216

Type of Study: One group pretest-posttest study
Number of Participants: 10

Population:

  • Age — 9-16 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 40% Caucasian, 40% African Descent, and 20% Other
  • Gender — 80% Female
  • Status — Participants were children/adolescents recruited from an ongoing cohort of youth at risk for bipolar disorders.

Location/Institution: Not specified

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The present study examined Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) for the treatment of anxiety disorders in children at risk for bipolar disorder. Measures utilized include the Washington University at St. Louis Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (WASH-UKSADS), the Paediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS), the Children’s Depression Rating Scale Revised (CDRS-R), the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-present/lifetime (SCID-P/L), and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A).Results indicated clinician-rated anxiety was significantly reduced after intervention, as well as youth-rated trait anxiety. Parent-rated emotion regulation significantly increased from before to after intervention. Increases in mindfulness were associated with decreases in anxiety. Children and parents/guardians reported high levels of feasibility, acceptability and usefulness of the intervention. Limitations include lack of randomization, lack of comparison group, lack of follow-up, and small sample size.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Strawn, J. R., Cotton, S., Luberto, C. M., Patino, L. R., Stahl, L. A., Weber, W. A., ... DelBello, M. P. (2016). Neural function before and after Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in anxious adolescents at risk for developing bipolar disorder. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 26(4), 372-379. doi:10.1089/cap.2015.0054

Type of Study: Pretest-posttest
Number of Participants: 9

Population:

  • Age — 9-16 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 4 African American, 3 Caucasian, and 2 Mixed
  • Gender — 7 Female and 2 Male
  • Status — Participants were children with anxiety disorders and their caregivers.

Location/Institution: Center for Imaging Research at the University of Cincinnati

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study utilized population from Cotton et al. (2014). This study evaluates the neurophysiology of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) in youth with generalized, social, and/or separation anxiety disorder who were at risk for developing bipolar disorder. Measures utilized include the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, the Crovitz Handedness Questionnaire, the Duke Tanner stage self-assessment, the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS), and the Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM). Results indicated MBCT-C was associated with increases in activation of the bilateral insula, lentiform nucleus, and thalamus, as well as the left anterior cingulate while viewing emotional stimuli during the continuous processing task with emotional and neutral distractors (CPT-END), and decreases in anxiety were correlated with change in activation in the bilateral insula and anterior cingulate during the viewing of emotional stimuli. Limitations include lack of randomization, lack of comparison group, lack of follow-up, and small sample size.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Abedini, S., Habibi, M., Semple, R. J., Dehghani, M., & Achenbach, T. (in press). The effectiveness of an adapted Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for internalizing and attention problems in children with cancer. Journal of Child and Family Studies.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial with matching
Number of Participants: 40

Population:

  • Age — 11-13 years (Mean=12.12 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — 21 Males and 19 Females
  • Status — Participants were pre-adolescent children diagnosed with cancer.

Location/Institution: Mahak and Mofid hospitals in Teheran, Iran

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Children (MBCT-C) for managing internalizing and attention problems in children with cancer. Participants were randomized to either a MBCT-C or to a treatment as usual group (TAU). Measures utilized include the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Youth Self-Report (YSR). Results indicated when compared with the TAU group, no child in the MBCT-C group had clinically elevated symptoms in internalizing and attention problems at the two-month follow-up. Limitations include changes in time and lengths of MBCT-C protocol and length of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 2 months.

References

Semple, R. J., & Burke, C. A. (2011). Treating children and adolescents with mindfulness. In P. C. Kendall (Ed.), Child and Adolescent Therapy: Cognitive-Behavioral Procedures (4th ed., pp. 411-426). New York: Guilford Press.

Semple, R. J., & Lee, J. (2011). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxious children: A manual for treating childhood anxiety. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Semple, R. J., & Lee, J. (2014). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for children. In R. A. Baer (Ed.), Mindfulness-Based Treatment Approaches: Clinician's Guide to Evidence Base and Applications (2nd ed., pp. 159-188). San Diego, CA: Elsevier.

Contact Information

Name: Randye J. Semple, PhD
Title: Assistant Professor
Agency/Affiliation: Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California
Department: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Website: www.sites.google.com/site/randyesemplephd
Email:
Phone: (323) 442-4000
Fax: (323) 442-4003

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: September 2016

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: April 2017

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2017