Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery

Scientific Rating:
NR
Not able to be Rated
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery has been reviewed by the CEBC in the area of: Substance Abuse Treatment (Adult), but lacks the necessary research evidence to be given a Scientific Rating.

Target Population: Parents who are in substance abuse treatment and recovery; and may have current or past mental health issues and/or trauma.

For children/adolescents ages: 0 – 17

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 0 – 17

Brief Description

The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery focuses on the effects of substance abuse on families, parenting, and the parent-child relationship. Combining experiential and didactic exercises, the approach is designed to enhance parents' self-awareness and thereby increase their capacity to understand their children. Parents may experience loss of self-image as being capable, effective parents. They may have a diminished capacity for empathy. In addition, the parent-child bond may be weakened by periods of physical and/or emotional unavailability of parents; thus resulting in gaps in parents' knowledge of the experiences, milestones and growth of their children. This program is designed to assist parents in re-establishing the strength of their connections with their children.


Program Goals:

The goals for Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery are:

  • To enhance parents’ self-awareness and thereby increase understanding of their children.
  • To enhance parents’ attunement to both their feelings, thoughts, and needs, as well as the feelings, thoughts, and needs of their children and loved ones.
  • To re-establish the strength of parents’ connections to their children so that parents and children can heal together.
  • To explore, discover, and cultivate parents’ and family members’ strengths and assets.
  • To address the specific parenting needs of families affected by parental substance use and co-occurring disorders.
  • To enhance parents’ capacity to nurture themselves and their children.
  • To help strengthen parents’ and children’s self-esteem.

Essential Components

  • Parents and group facilitators participating in this program are collaborators in the process; the model is both interactive and instructional.
  • The focus throughout the program is on nurturing the parent, while expanding the parents' ability to transmit this nurturance to their children.
  • Parents practice parenting skills in sessions, and then with their child(ren). There is a Family Activities Manual, published by Family Development Resources, Inc., which was designed to provide activities for parents and children to do together, and to be used as a complement to the Nurturing Program. In addition, one adaptation of the curriculum includes a curriculum designed for children's groups, covering similar topics as the parenting curriculum, to be completed at the same time as the parenting groups.
  • Parents learn to see addiction as a disease affecting all family members, across generations, and that recovery is also a process, which affects all family members, across generations.
  • The learning involved in this program, like the experience of recovery, involves re-working of tasks and stages of life, and re-evaluation and re-patterning of principles and actions.
  • There are 3 sessions specifically designed for work with men/fathers, to address specific concerns that men have related to substance use and parenting. These sessions may be used in addition to the 17 basic topic areas, or substituted for other topics (suggested topics for substitution provided). These sessions allow men to examine what it means to be a man, what place men have in the lives of their children, and the challenges that exist as they struggle to balance parenting and recovery.
  • The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery: Guide for Individual Use, is available for use with individuals and families who may not be ready for a group experience. It is geared for individual/family work in a variety of home and program settings, including in home visiting programs.

Child/Adolescent Services

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Child of a parent with a substance use disorder, mental health issues, and/or trauma.

Parent/Caregiver Services

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Substance use disorders, mental health issues, and/or trauma.

Adult Services

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery directly provides services to adults (regardless of whether they are parents or caregivers) and addresses the following:

  • Substance use disorders, mental health issues, and/or trauma.

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Community Agency
  • Outpatient Clinic
  • Residential Care Facility
  • School

Languages

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery does not have materials available in a language other than English.

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

  • Tables and chairs that can be moved around for small group activities
  • TV/DVD player
  • Some art and crafts supplies

Minimum Provider Qualifications

Experience with substance abuse treatment/recovery and parenting/child development strongly recommended; plus group facilitation experience.

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program, and there is training available for this program.

Training Contact:
Training is obtained:

Training is provided in Massachusetts 2x/year. Training is also provided nationally.

Number of days/hours:

2 days of training/7 hours each day.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program has been reviewed and it was determined that this program lacks the type of published, peer-reviewed research that meets the CEBC criteria for a scientific rating of 1 – 5. Therefore, the program has been given the classification of "NR - Not able to be Rated." It was reviewed because it was identified by the topic expert as a program being used in the field, or it is being marketed and/or used in California with children receiving services from child welfare or related systems and their parents/caregivers. Some programs that are not rated may have published, peer-reviewed research that does not meet the above stated criteria or may have eligible studies that have not yet been published in the peer-reviewed literature. For more information on the "NR - Not able to be Rated" classification, please see the Scientific Rating Scale.

Child Welfare Outcomes: Not Specified

Show relevant research...

Camp, J. M., & Finkelstein, N. (1997). Parenting training for women in residential substance abuse treatment. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 14(5), 411-422.

Type of Study: Pretest/Posttest
Number of Participants: 170

Population:

  • Age range — 27.3 years on average
  • Race/Ethnicity — 72% Black, 21% White, 4% Hispanic, 2% Native American, and 1% Other
  • Gender — Not Specified
  • Status — Women enrolled in a residential program for substance-abusing mothers and their children.

Location / Institution: Boston, MA

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Women in two parenting program sites were assessed at intake using the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI), the Hudson Self-Esteem Index, and the Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training Feeding Scale (NCAST). Women at site A showed improvement on all domains of the AAPI between baseline and follow-up and women at site B showed improvement on two domains: Lack of Empathy and Role Reversal. Women in the study had good parent-child interaction scores on the NCAST at baseline, but also showed improvement over time. For site A, the greatest improvement was seen in white women, while at site B, the biggest gains were seen for black women, the majority ethnic group at that site. Limitations include attrition rates and concerns regarding differences in program delivery between the two sites.

Length of post-intervention follow-up: None.

Moore, J., & Finkelstein, N. (2001). Parenting services for families affected by substance abuse. Child Welfare, 80(2), 221-238.

Type of Study: Pretest/Posttest
Number of Participants: 170

Population:

  • Age range — 27.3 years on average
  • Race/Ethnicity — 72% Black, 21% White, 4% Hispanic, 2% Native American, and 1% Other
  • Gender — Not Specified
  • Status — Women enrolled in a residential program for substance-abusing mothers and their children.

Location / Institution: Boston, MA

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Note: This publication uses the same sample as Camp and Finkelstein (1997). Women completing the Nurturing Program had longer average times to relapse than those who did not complete the program. (14.7 months versus 9.4 months.)

Length of post-intervention follow-up: None.

References

Show references...

Alvorado, R., Kendall, K., Beesley, S., & Lee-Cavaness, C. (Eds.). (2000). Strengthening America's families: model family programs for substance abuse and deliquency prevention. Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah.

Jablonski, B. (2001). The SAMHSA women co-occurring disorders and violence children's subset study. The Tapestry, Fall, 3-6.

Jablonski, B., & Moses, D. J. (2002). Innovations from the sites: Nurturing Families affected by substance abuse, mental illness and trauma: a parenting curriculum for women and children. Delmar, NY: Policy Research Associates.

Curriculum: Family Development Resources. (2012). Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment & Recovery, (3rd ed.).
The title of Guide: Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment & Recovery Guide for individual use. People may order through IHR website under Products; www.healthrecovery.org

Contact Information

Name: Dianna Christmas
Agency/Affiliation: The Institute for Health and Recovery
Website: www.healthrecovery.org
Email:
Phone: (617) 661-3991
Fax: (617) 661-7277

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: June 2013

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: August 2006

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: August 2006