Positive Discipline Parent Education

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Scientific Rating:
NR
Not able to be Rated
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Low
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Positive Discipline Parent Education has been reviewed by the CEBC in the area of: Parent Training Programs that Address Behavior Problems in Children and Adolescents, but lacks the necessary research evidence to be given a Scientific Rating.

Target Population: Parents of children who are typically developing (infants through teens) and teachers of children (toddlers through teens) who are typically-developing; parents, teachers, and service providers of children with special needs (infants through teens), including children with disorders of attachment, children on the autism spectrum and children exposed to trauma

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 0 – 17

Brief Description

Based on the work of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, Positive Discipline Parent Education promotes an internal locus of control, self-regulation, understanding others' perspectives, and the desire to contribute in meaningful ways to the community. The model can be categorized as a form of “authoritative” parenting – one that promotes a strong parent-to-child connection, as well as clear boundaries/limits. This parent education program teaches parents specific tools to help implement authoritative parenting that has been identified by Dr. Diana Baumrind as optimal for child development and overall well-being. Furthermore, these tools are designed to help parents balance being kind and firm at the same time. Examples of parenting tools include: encouragement, using curiosity questions, tone of voice, acting without words, validate feelings, and limit setting. This program gives parents alternatives to using rewards and punishment.

Positive Discipline Parent Education is taught in groups using an experiential model. Participants engage with the material through role-play and activities that invite them to connect the new material with their current life. The model also gives parents/care-givers the opportunity to practice new skills within the safe environment of the class.

Program Goals:

The goals of Positive Discipline Parent Education are:

  • Decreased harshness in parenting
  • Increased connection (parent to child)
  • Increased skill (parental and child) in self-regulation
  • Increased skill in communication
  • Increased skill in sharing and teaching responsibilities
  • Increased skill in solution-focused problem solving
  • Ability to build family connections through the use of family meetings

Contact Information

Name: Kelly Gfroerer, PhD, LPC
Agency/Affiliation: Positive Discipline Association
Website: www.positivediscipline.org
Email:
Phone: (866) 767-3472

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: December 2015

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: October 2017

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2011