Resilience Alliance

Scientific Rating:
NR
Not able to be Rated
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
High
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Resilience Alliance has been reviewed by the CEBC in the area of: Child Welfare Workforce Development and Support Programs, but lacks the necessary research evidence to be given a Scientific Rating.

Target Population: Child welfare staff, supervisors, and administrators

Brief Description

Resilience Alliance is designed to mitigate secondary trauma symptoms experienced by child welfare staff, and secondary trauma’s impact on unit and agency functioning. Participants are provided with information and tools to help them identify, better understand, and address the ways child welfare work affects them personally and professionally. The intervention has a strong focus on how secondary trauma influences organizational cohesion and functioning, which requires the participation of all levels of staff, including leadership.

Resilience Alliance is delivered in weekly group sessions, over a 24-week period. Each session includes a brief didactic lesson focusing on a particular resilience skill, an exercise that allows the group to practice implementing the skill, and a “take away” assignment that encourages participants to implement the skill in their daily work.

Program Goals:

The goals of Resilience Alliance are:

  • Reduced symptoms of secondary traumatic stress
  • Increased self-efficacy
  • Increased collaboration
  • Increased job satisfaction
  • Reduced attrition
  • Improved casework practice

Essential Components

The essential components of Resilience Alliance include:

  • Designed to target the impact of traumatic stress on staff functioning and mutual support within the workplace setting, while acknowledging that the work with children and families is an important source of secondary traumatic stress
  • Designed to be delivered to an established group of child welfare staff; this could be a specific work area, an office or a whole agency
  • Delivered in weekly group sessions, and all staff within the target group – including supervisors and leadership – participate in the intervention
    • Guidance is provided in the training manual for how to engage stakeholders (leadership and supervisors) before beginning the intervention
    • Two pre-intervention meetings that are recommended to be held for all intervention participants before the weekly group sessions begin
  • Designed around a 4-week cycle where each week different groups of staff participate in the group sessions, which allows for some same-peer sessions (e.g., caseworker-only groups, supervisor-only groups) and some unit-based sessions (e.g., groups comprised of a supervisor and their caseworker team)
    • This provides for sessions where staff can feel safe sharing their experiences/concerns with their peers, as well as sessions focused on unit cohesion and functioning
  • Three concepts underlie the group sessions:
    • Optimism
    • Mastery
    • Collaboration
    • Each one counteracts common responses to secondary trauma exposure (e.g., optimism counteracts negativity and hopelessness)
  • Weekly sessions focus on different resilience-related skills that are related to or build on one or more of the core concepts, and each session is broken into three components:
    • A didactic review of the resilience concept/skill
    • An exercise that allows participants to practice the skill and debrief with the group
    • A take-away activity that allows participants to implement the skill into their work during the upcoming week
  • The first 12 weeks of the intervention are structured cumulatively so that participants get practice building on/integrating the skills
  • During the second 12 weeks the facilitator chooses modules that best address the current needs of the group

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Community Agency
  • Department of Social Services

Homework

Resilience Alliance includes a homework component:

At the end of each session participants are given a take-away activity that allows them to incorporate a given resilience skill into their daily work over the coming week.

Languages

Resilience Alliance does not have materials available in a language other than English.

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

For the purposes of privacy/confidentiality, the group session should be conducted in separate space where people will not be interrupted and other people in the office cannot hear the discussion.

Minimum Provider Qualifications

It is recommended that this intervention be delivered by someone with clinical training that includes group work. It can either be implemented by someone from an external organization or by someone in a different area of the agency It should not be implemented by a supervisor or manager within the target work group.

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program; but there is not training available for this program.

ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute. (2011). The Resilience Alliance: Promoting resilience and reducing secondary trauma among child welfare staff. New York, NY.

Training manual: http://nctsn.org/products/nctsn-affiliated-resources/resilience-alliance-promoting-resilience-and-reducing-secondary-trauma

Participant handbook: http://nctsn.org/products/nctsn-affiliated-resources/resilience-alliance-promoting-resilience-and-reducing-secondary-trauma-handbook

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program has been reviewed and it was determined that this program lacks the type of published, peer-reviewed research that meets the CEBC criteria for a scientific rating of 1 – 5. Therefore, the program has been given the classification of "NR - Not able to be Rated." It was reviewed because it was identified by the topic expert as a program being used in the field, or it is being marketed and/or used in California with children receiving services from child welfare or related systems and their parents/caregivers. Some programs that are not rated may have published, peer-reviewed research that does not meet the above stated criteria or may have eligible studies that have not yet been published in the peer-reviewed literature. For more information on the "NR - Not able to be Rated" classification, please see the Scientific Rating Scale.

Child Welfare Outcomes: Not Specified

Currently, there are no published, peer-reviewed research studies for Resilience Alliance.

References

ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute. (2012). Addressing secondary traumatic stress among child welfare staff: A practice brief. New York: NYU Langone Medical Center. Retrieved from http://www.nctsn.org/content/addressing-secondary-traumatic-stress-among-child-welfare-staff-practice-brief

ACS-NYU Children’s Trauma Institute. (2011). The Resilience Alliance: Promoting resilience and reducing secondary trauma among child welfare staff. Retrieved from http://nctsn.org/products/nctsn-affiliated-resources/resilience-alliance-promoting-resilience-and-reducing-secondary-trauma

Tullberg, E., Avinadav, R., & Chemtob, C. (2012). Going beyond self-care: Effectively addressing secondary traumatic stress among child protective staff. CW360°, Spring, 22.

Contact Information

Name: Erika Tullberg, MPA, MPH
Agency/Affiliation: NYU School of Medicine
Email:
Phone: (646) 754-5107
Name: Claude Chemtob, PhD
Agency/Affiliation: NYU School of Medicine
Email:
Phone: (212) 754-5465

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: April 2017

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: May 2017

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: June 2017