The Safe Child Program

Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. The Safe Child Program has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (Primary) Programs.

Target Population: Preschool through Grade 3

For children/adolescents ages: 3 – 9

Brief Description

The Safe Child Program has been rated in the area of Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (Primary) Programs. The Safe Child Program is a comprehensive curriculum which teaches prevention of sexual, emotional and physical abuse by people known to the child; prevention of abuse and abduction by strangers; and safety in self-care. Presented in a preschool through third grade series, it teaches a broad base of life skills.

Program Goals:

The overall goals of The Safe Child Program are:

  • Teach prevention of child abuse to children in a way that:
    • Is positive, non-explicit and non-threatening
    • Teaches skills which reduce children’s vulnerability
    • Raises self-esteem and improves self-reliance
    • Is multiracial and multicultural
  • Educate teachers, parent and administrators to support prevention of child abuse:
    • Teacher training to ensure consistent presentation of the program
    • Parental education to enhance understanding and reinforce program goals
    • Videotapes to guarantee the accurate introduction of the concepts to the children

Essential Components

The essential components of The Safe Child Program include:

  • Teacher training to ensure consistent presentation of the program
  • Parental involvement to enhance understanding and support of program goals
  • Multi-racial and multi-cultural (parent and child materials are available in English, Spanish, Creole and French)
  • Positive, non-explicit approach which respects the needs of children and families
  • Program initiation at the preschool level with annual, age-appropriate development of the concepts and skills
  • Multi-session instruction, five to ten sessions each year of the program
  • Videotapes to guarantee the accurate introduction and modeling of the concepts to the children
  • Well-scripted classroom role-playing to develop individual mastery of safety skills
  • Emphasis on life skills which have been shown to enable children to utilize prevention skills

Child/Adolescent Services

The Safe Child Program directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Inherent vulnerability of young children
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: Parental participation is not required for children to receive the program, but parental information is provided consistently via video, take home materials and parent seminar in order to help them understand the issues and support their children to utilize the skills being taught

Delivery Setting

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • School

Homework

The Safe Child Program includes a homework component:

Parent seminar and video are available. Parent materials are sent home every day of the program specifically addressing instruction child received that day.

Languages

The Safe Child Program has materials available in languages other than English:

Creole, French, Spanish

For information on which materials are available in these languages, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

There are no minimum educational requirements for providing the program to children. Providers should review the Teacher Training video and manual that comes with the program before presenting the program.

Minimum Provider Qualifications

There are no minimum educational requirements for providing the program to children. Providers should review the Teacher Training video and manual that comes with the program before presenting the program.

Education and Training Resources

There is a manual that describes how to implement this program; but there is not training available for this program.

Implementation Information

Since The Safe Child Program is rated on the Scientific Rating Scale, information was requested from the program representative on available pre-implementation assessments, implementation tools, and/or fidelity measures.

Show implementation information...

Pre-Implementation Materials

There are no pre-implementation materials to measure organizational or provider readiness for The Safe Child Program.

Formal Support for Implementation

There is no formal support available for implementation of The Safe Child Program.

Fidelity Measures

There are fidelity measures for The Safe Child Program as listed below:

There are fidelity tools used in original research including knowledge pretests and posttests. Please contact Dr. Kraizer at kraizer@safechild.org for more information.

Implementation Guides or Manuals

There are implementation guides or manuals for The Safe Child Program as listed below:

Information on implementation comes with the program.

Research on How to Implement the Program

Research has not been conducted on how to implement The Safe Child Program.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program is rated a "3 - Promising Research Evidence" on the Scientific Rating Scale based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The practice must have at least one study utilizing some form of control (e.g., untreated group, placebo group, matched wait list study) establishing the practice's benefit over the placebo, or found it to be comparable to or better than an appropriate comparison practice. Please see the Scientific Rating Scale for more information.

Child Welfare Outcome: Safety

Show relevant research...

Fryer, G. E., Kraizer, S. K., & Mlyoshi, T. (1987). Measuring actual reduction of risk to child abuse: A new approach. Child Abuse & Neglect, 11(2), 173-179.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 48

Population:

  • Age — K,1st and 2nd grades (approximately 4-8 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were students in midtown Denver elementary school.

Location/Institution: Denver, CO

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examined effects of The Safe Child Program (Previously called the Children Need to Know Personal Safety Training Program). Students were randomly assigned to Safe Child or a control group. Measures included the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the Harter Perceived Competence Scale for Children, the Children Need to Know Knowledge Attitude Test, and a live simulation scenario involving a stranger. Results showed that children in the Safe Child group improved on the simulation scenario. Limitations include the small sample size and possible differences across the simulations.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Fryer, G. E., Kraizer, S. K., & Mlyoshi, T. (1987). Measuring children's retention of skills to resist stranger abduction: Use of the simulation technique. Child abuse & neglect, 11(2), 181-185.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 30

Population:

  • Age — K,1st and 2nd grades (approximately 4-8 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were students in midtown Denver elementary school.

Location/Institution: Denver, CO

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Note: This study uses a subset of the sample from Fryer, G. E., Kraizer, S. K., & Mlyoshi, T. (1987). This study examined effects of The Safe Child Program (Previously called the Children Need to Know Personal Safety Training Program). Students were randomly assigned to Safe Child or a control group; the control group later received the intervention. Measures included the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the Harter Perceived Competence Scale for children, the Children Need to Know Knowledge Attitude Test, and a live simulation scenario involving a stranger. Results showed that children originally assigned to the program were successful on the simulation six months after training, and all children in the original control group were successful on the simulation after training. Limitations include that, despite retraining, some children were not able to pass the simulation test, differences between the administrations of the simulation test, and small sample size.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 0-6 months.

Kraizer, S. K., Fryer, G. E., & Miller, M. (1987). Programming for preventing sexual abuse and abduction: What does it mean when it works?. Child Welfare, 67(1), 69-78.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 48

Population:

  • Age — K,1st and 2nd grades (approximately 4-8 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were students in midtown Denver elementary school.

Location/Institution: Denver, CO

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Note: This study uses the same sample as Fryer, G. E., Kraizer, S. K., & Mlyoshi, T. (1987). This study examined effects of The Safe Child Program (Previously called the Children Need to Know Personal Safety Training Program). Students were randomly assigned to Safe Child or a control group; the control group later received the intervention. Measures included the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the Harter Perceived Competence Scale for children, the Children Need to Know Knowledge Attitude Test, and a live simulation scenario involving a stranger. Results showed that children successfully passed the simulation and did not leave with the stranger. Limitations include the small sample size, lack of comparison to the control group at follow-up, and possible differences across the simulations.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 6 months (intervention group only, as the control group had received the intervention at this point).

Kraizer, S., Witte, S. S., & Freyer, G. E. (1989). Child sexual abuse prevention programs: What makes them effective in protecting children?. Children Today, 18(5), 23-27.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 670

Population:

  • Age — 3-10 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Not specified
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were students from rural, urban, and suburban schools.

Location/Institution: Three different states

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examined the effects of The Safe Child Program. Measures included simulation and role play exercised, as well as a one-on-one interview. Results showed that the children in The Safe Child Program improved on the role play measure after the intervention. Few children reported any fear or anxiety after the program. Limitations include the lack of detail on the study methods and the lack of follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

References

Kraizer, S. K. (1986). Rethinking prevention. Child Abuse & Neglect, 10(2), 259-261.

Kraizer, S. (1990). Children in self-care: A new perspective. Child Welfare, 69(6), 571-581.

Contact Information

Name: Sherryll Kraizer, PhD
Agency/Affiliation: Coalition for Children
Website: www.safechild.org
Email:
Phone: (303) 809-9001

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: September 2016

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: October 2016

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2015