“Who Do You Tell?”™

Note: The “Who Do You Tell?”™ program was not responsive to the CEBC's inquiry. The following information was obtained from publicly available sources.

Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

“Who Do You Tell?”™ has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (Primary) Programs.

Target Population: Children from kindergarten to grade 6

Brief Description

The “Who Do You Tell?”™ child sexual abuse education program is designed for children from kindergarten to grade 6, with three different versions tailored to reflect the developmental level of the children being taught. It is delivered to Kindergarteners and those in grades 3-6 in two 45-minute sessions, those in grade 1 have nine sessions and those in grade 2 have eight on separate days in order to enhance retention by the students. Typically, “Who Do You Tell?”™ is taught in a classroom setting, but can easily be adapted to other child-oriented settings (e.g., community centers, boys and girls clubs, etc.).

A one-hour session with teachers outlining what will be taught, how to recognize sexual abuse in children, and how to respond to disclosures is an additional part of the program. A parent night which prepares parents for their children’s participation in the program and provides them with information about child sexual abuse and responding to disclosures is also included.

Education and Training Resources

Publicly available information indicates there is a manual that describes how to implement this program, and there is some training available for this program.
See contact info below.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

This program is rated a "3 - Promising Research Evidence" on the Scientific Rating Scale based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The practice must have at least one study utilizing some form of control (e.g., untreated group, placebo group, matched wait list study) establishing the practice's benefit over the placebo, or found it to be comparable to or better than an appropriate comparison practice. Please see the Scientific Rating Scale for more information.

Child Welfare Outcomes: Not Specified

Show relevant research...

Tutty, L. (1997). Child sexual abuse prevention programs: Evaluating Who Do You Tell. Child Abuse & Neglect, 21, 869–881. doi:10.1016/S0145-2134(97)00048-3

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 231

Population:

  • Age — 1st-6th grade (approximately 5-12 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — 88% Caucasian
  • Gender — Not specified
  • Status — Participants were children attending two elementary separate (Catholic) schools.

Location/Institution: Calgary, Canada

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examined the “Who Do You Tell?”™ sexual abuse prevention program for elementary school-aged children. Children were randomly assigned to participate in the program (N=117) or in a waitlist control condition. Measures included the Children's Knowledge of Abuse Questionnaire - Revised (CKAQ-R). Results showed that children who received the “Who Do You Tell?”™ program increased their knowledge levels of both Inappropriate Touch and Appropriate Touch to a significantly greater degree than children in the control group. Age also significantly differentiated the knowledge levels regarding Inappropriate Touch, with younger children knowing fewer concepts both at pretest and posttest. Limitations include the small effect sizes, different results by age group, and lack of effect on actual abuse outcomes.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Tutty, L. (2000). What children learn from sexual abuse prevention programs: Difficult concepts and developmental issues. Research on Social Work Practice, 10, 275–300.

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 231

Population:

  • Age — 1st- 6th grade (approximately 5-12 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — 88% Caucasian
  • Gender — Not Specified
  • Status — Participants were children attending two elementary separate (Catholic) schools.

Location/Institution: Calgary, Canada

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
Note: This study uses the same sample as Tutty, 1997. This study examined children's prior knowledge levels with respect to abuse prevention concepts and what ideas are most responsive to intervention for what ages would be invaluable to those who wish to develop and revise programs. Analyses compared changes on each item based on “Who Do You Tell?”™ group versus control condition and developmental level (ages 5 to 7 compared to ages 8 to 13). Three items significantly improved for children in the “Who Do You Tell?”™ program as compared to the control condition across ages dealing with telling others when uncomfortable with touch, children's rights with respect to grown-ups, and secrets. In each of these, and an additional 15 items, scores were significantly lower for younger than older children, suggesting that these concepts may need to be taught differently.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

References

No reference materials are currently available for “Who Do You Tell?”™ .

Contact Information

Name: Daniel Aubry, BSW, MSW
Agency/Affiliation: Calgary Communities Against Sexual Abuse
Website: www.whodoyoutell.com
Email:
Phone: (403) 237-6905 x228

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: January 2017

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: April 2015

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2015