Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS)

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Scientific Rating:
3
Promising Research Evidence
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
Medium
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) has been rated by the CEBC in the area of: Mentoring Programs (Child & Adolescent).

Target Population: Youth aged 6-18 who may come from disadvantaged situations, such as single-parent homes, low-income homes, or homes with an absent parent (e.g., a parent in the military or a parent who is incarcerated)

For children/adolescents ages: 6 – 18

Brief Description

Each youth is matched with a carefully screened and trained volunteer adult or high school mentor, and matches meet once a week at school (school-based program) or in community settings (community-based program). Matches can spend their time together talking, doing homework, doing crafts, playing games or sports, and in community-based matches, they spend time doing activities in the community like attending cultural events, going to restaurants or movies, or exploring other interests. Independent Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies provide support, ongoing training, and resources to the mentor (“Big”) and mentee (“Little”) to enable development of a positive and trusting relationship. Agencies may also organize activities or events for matches to attend. Agencies are responsible for obtaining their own funding and implementing their program based on the national Standards of Practice and Service Delivery Model. In addition to the foundational mentoring program, agencies may offer specific programs targeted at particular populations of children (such as Hispanic Mentoring, Native American Mentoring, Military Mentoring, or mentoring for children of incarcerated parents) or focused on particular activities or skill-development (such as workplace mentoring).

Program Goals:

The goals for Big Brothers Big Sisters are:

  • Partner with parents/guardians, volunteers and others in the community
  • Hold itself accountable for each child in the program achieving:
    • Higher aspirations, greater confidence, and better relationships
    • Avoidance of risky behaviors
    • Educational success

Contact Information

Name: Hillary Bardwell
Title: Director, Foundation Grants
Agency/Affiliation: Big Brothers Big Sisters
Website: www.bbbsa.org
Email:
Phone: (813) 605-7418

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: March 2017

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: April 2014

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2012