Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®)

1  — Well-Supported by Research Evidence
Medium
3  — Promising Research Evidence
Medium

About This Program

Target Population: Families with maladaptive interactions resulting in at least one youth aged 6-18 years with externalizing (e.g., substance abuse, delinquency, truancy, bullying) and/or internalizing (e.g., depression, anxiety) symptomatology

For children/adolescents ages: 6 – 18

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 6 – 18

Program Overview

The Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) Model uses a structured family-systems approach to treat families with youth (6 to 18 years) who display or are at risk for developing problem behaviors including substance abuse, conduct problems, and delinquency. There are three intervention components:

  • Therapists must establish and maintain a viable and effective therapeutic relationship with family members = Joining.
  • By eliciting and observing family interactions (Enactments), therapists identify interactional patterns that are associated with problematic youth behavior = Systemic Diagnosis.
  • Therapists design and execute a treatment plan. The interventions are designed to be done in the session focusing on the here and now using Highlights, Reframes, and assigning Tasks that elicit more effective and adaptive family interactions = Restructuring

BSFT® is typically delivered in 12 to 16 weekly sessions in community centers, clinics, health agencies, or homes. BSFT® therapists are required to participate in a structured program of training to achieve Competency, and then are required to remain in a course of fidelity monitoring for adherence.

Program Goals

The goals of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) are:

For the child/youth:

  • Reduce behavior problems, while improving self-control
  • Reduce associations with antisocial peers
  • Reduce drug use
  • Develop prosocial behaviors

For the family:

  • Improve maladaptive patterns of family interactions (family functioning)
  • Improve family communication, conflict-resolution, and problem-solving skills
  • Improve family cohesiveness, collaboration, and parent-child bonding
  • Improve effective parenting, including successful management of children's behavior and positive affect in the parent-child interactions

Logic Model

View the Logic Model for Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®).

Essential Components

The essential components of the Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) Model include:

  • BSFT® addresses family behavior, affect, and cognitions with the goal of restructuring interactions and change the family system. The focus is on context versus content. BSFT® strategies and treatment plans are designed specifically for each family and are based on a structured diagnostic plan. The therapeutic process uses techniques of:
    • Joining: Therapist forms a therapeutic alliance with all family members, disarming defenses.
    • Enactments: Used to diagnose family systems and create effective therapeutic change. Enactments are what brings maladaptive interactional sequences into the therapy session and thus available for directed change. The therapist observes the family process directly, remaining decentralized and allowing family to behave “as usual”. There are spontaneous enactments and directed enactments.
    • BSFT® Systemic Diagnosis: A process-oriented, interactional diagnosis identifying interactional patterns that give rise to/encourage/enable problematic youth behavior. This family strengthening model forms the framework of the strategic therapeutic plan for intervention on the basis of clear, process-oriented, interactional diagnosis. This BSFT® diagnosis then becomes the map that specifically and precisely directs the therapy has 6 diagnostic dimensions:
      • Organization
      • Resonance
      • Developmental stages
      • Life context
      • Identified patient
      • Conflict resolution
    • Treatment Planning: Having diagnosed the problem in terms of these dimensions, it is possible to plan and execute targeted interventions directed at the problematic interactions uncovered within each dimension. It is aimed at capitalizing on strengths and correcting problematic family relations to increase family competence. Therefore, the therapist’s approach is problem-focused, treatment-plan-oriented, and practical so they can move from problematic to competent interactions.
    • Restructuring (Implementing Change Strategies): The process of changing the family interactions that are directly related to problem behaviors. The provider of BSFT® highlights a specific interactional pattern, reframes (see next bullet) to change perceptions associated with maladaptive interactions, assigns a therapeutic reversal task, and facilitates the task’s completion by the family; finally reinforcing new behaviors.
    • Reframing (BSFT® Systemic Cognitive Change): The BSFT® model reframes not just the family processes and interactions observed, but the contextual larger level at which the family has been experiencing itself and the Identified Patienthood of the system.
    • BSFT® Engagement Model: This model is designed to bring resisting families into therapy and maintain them for the duration of the treatment program. The BSFT®concepts described above are also the building blocks for the techniques that are used to engage resistant families into counseling, because the same family dynamics that are associated with the symptom (e.g., drug use, bullying, etc.) underlie resistance to engagement.

Program Delivery

Child/Adolescent Services

Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Youth aged 6–18 years with externalizing (e.g., substance abuse, acting-out, truancy, bullying) and/or internalizing (e.g., depression, anxiety) symptomatology. As well, the model works to restructure problematic family interactions
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: Because family problems are an integral part of the profile of problem youth and have been linked to the initiation and maintenance of adolescent drug use, it is necessary to improve conditions in the youth's most lasting and influential environment: the family, including siblings and extended family.

Parent/Caregiver Services

Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Parent of a child with problematic behavior, loss of parental authority, lack of guidance and/or nurturant behaviors guidance to youth; ineffective communication; lack of conflict resolution skills; negativity and hostility within the family, lack of positive bonding, negative role-modeling

Recommended Intensity:

1 to 1.5 hours weekly sessions unless needed more frequently during a crisis

Recommended Duration:

12 to 16 sessions; the number could be more depending on the severity of the presenting problems(s)

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Adoptive Home
  • Birth Family Home
  • Community Daily Living Setting
  • Foster / Kinship Care
  • Hospital
  • Outpatient Clinic
  • Community-based Agency / Organization / Provider
  • Group or Residential Care
  • School Setting (Including: Day Care, Day Treatment Programs, etc.)
  • Virtual (Online, Telephone, Video, Zoom, etc.)

Homework

Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) includes a homework component:

The therapist is encouraged to give the family homework once he/she has successfully led the family through a new and improved interactional pattern within that session. The therapist gives the family homework to reinforce the newly restructured changes within the session. Homework could involve communication skills, cooperation, parental guidance, bonding activities.

Languages

Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) has materials available in a language other than English:

Spanish

For information on which materials are available in this language, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

Video cameras, computers, therapy rooms large enough to sit a family of 2-8 people, and ability to offer flexible working hours as families are usually seen after school/work

Manuals and Training

Prerequisite/Minimum Provider Qualifications

Typically at least a master’s degree in social work, marriage and family therapy, psychology, or a related field. Therapists are expected to have training and/or experience with basic clinical skills common to many behavioral interventions. Practitioners at a Bachelor’s level with 5+ years of clinical experience can also be eligible.

Manual Information

There is a manual that describes how to deliver this program.

Program Manual(s)

Manual citation:

  • Szapocznik, J., & Hervis, O. E. (2020). Brief Strategic Family Therapy. American Psychological Association Press.

The manual can be purchased directly from APA.org/books, Amazon, Target, and Barnes and Noble.

Training Information

There is training available for this program.

Training Contacts:
Training Type/Location:

Onsite at the trainee organization or online (virtual workshops through HIPAA-compliant Zoom)

Number of days/hours:

The training of this model consists of live workshops. The workshops are a combination of didactics, practice exercises and videotape analysis of BSFT family sessions. They also include clinical presentations and live consultations or supervisions of family sessions. Furthermore, it includes a supervision practicum that begins 1-2 weeks after the initial workshop and continues for 4-6 months depending on trainee advancement. This supervision practicum entails weekly phone reviews of the trainees’ electronically recorded BSFT family sessions, along with group feedback.

After sites successfully complete training and meet competency and fidelity requirements, they are then licensed. Both the Brief Strategic Family Therapy Institute and the Family Therapy Training Institute of Miami are able to license sites.

Implementation Information

Pre-Implementation Materials

There are pre-implementation materials to measure organizational or provider readiness for Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) as listed below:

Sites that wish to offer the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) Model are initially required to demonstrate readiness for integrating the program into their organization. To that end, a Site Readiness process is implemented prior to training. Agency supervisors, directors, and community stakeholders are involved in the pretraining Organizational Readiness process to provide formal support for implementation of BSFT. The objective is to acquaint this support staff with the essentials of how the model operates, inform them of the model’s need for the agency to institute viability and sustainability drivers and help the agency to put those in place.

Formal Support for Implementation

There is formal support available for implementation of Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) as listed below:

Technical and clinical assistance is provided as needed throughout the implementation process and through the required Fidelity Monitoring program that follows Competency. The agency also develops its own Model Management and support capabilities by training Certified BSFT Supervisors and Trainers. Finally, Booster Sessions are offered when needed or requested by the agency. These are specifically designed for the particular agency’s needs.

Fidelity Measures

There are fidelity measures for Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) as listed below:

The program representatives (contact information listed below) administer Standardized Fidelity Rating Instruments for both Competency and Adherence at various intervals of the BSFT® implementation. There is a formal required adherence/fidelity program provided to the BSFT®-competent Therapists via periodic adherence supervision sessions. Self-report checklists, trained observations, and video/audio recordings are included in the fidelity rating process.

Fidelity Measure Requirements:

Clinicians’ performance is rated after each session using the BSFT Adherence Certification Checklist and it is based on a rating of the clinician’s videotaped session. The rating is initially done by BSFT Institute Faculty until the agency develops its own BSFT Certified Supervisor. The BSFT Adherence Certification Checklist is provided to the agency’s staff during training.

Implementation Guides or Manuals

There are implementation guides or manuals for Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) as listed below:

Extensive copyrighted PowerPoint presentation, copies of publications in scientific journals, handouts, and BSFT clinical recording forms that cover all aspects of the BSFT® model and its implementation requirements and which are provided to the agency staff as part of both the Organizational and clinical training workshops and are specific to their various roles as administrators and support staff or clinicians. These cover all aspects of both viability and sustainability drivers essential to implementation success.

The BSFT websites have important information on this subject:

  • http://www.bsft-av.com
  • http://www.bsft.org

Implementation Cost

There have been studies of the costs of implementing Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) which are listed below:

Carroll County Local Management board, Maryland. 2009 SAMHSA Science and Service Award, Lynn Davis, Maryland (2009)

Research on How to Implement the Program

Research has been conducted on how to implement Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) as listed below:

Robbins, M. S., Feaster, D. J., Horigian, V. E., Puccinelli, M. J., Henderson, C., & Szapocznik, J. (2011). Therapist adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for adolescent drug abusers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79, 43–53. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0022146

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Multiple meta-analyses, see citations following, have also been conducted on Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) though these articles are not used for rating and therefore are not summarized:

  • Szapocznik, J. , & Williams, R. (2000). Brief strategic family therapy: Twenty-five years of interplay among theory, research and practice in adolescent behavior problems and drug abuse. Clinical Child & Family Psychology Review, 3(2), 117-134. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1009512719808
  • Robbins, M. , Bachrach, K. , & Szapocznik, J. (2002). Bridging the research-practice gap in adolescent substance abuse treatment: The case of brief strategic family therapy. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 23(2), 123-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0740-5472(02)00265-9
  • Santisteban, D. , Suarez-Morales, L. , Robbins, M. , & Szapocznik, J. (2006). Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Lessons learned in efficacy research and challenges to blending research and practice. Family Process, 45(2), 259-271. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1545-5300.2006.00094.x

Santisteban, D., Perez-Vidal, A., Coatsworth, J., Kurtines, W., Schwartz, S., LaPerriere, A., & Szapocznik, J. (2003). Efficacy of Brief Strategic Family Therapy in modifying Hispanic adolescent behavior problems and substance use. Journal of Family Psychology, 17(1), 121–133. https://doi.org/10.1037/0893-3200.17.1.121

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 126 adolescents & their families

Population:

  • Age — 12-18 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Hispanic (various nationalities: Cuban, Nicaraguan, Colombian, Puerto Rican, Peruvian, Mexican, or Other)
  • Gender — 75% male, 25% female
  • Status — Participants were either self-referred or referred by a school counselor and met the primary inclusion criterion, namely parental or school complaints of externalizing behavior problems.

Location/Institution: Miami, FL/University of Miami

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) with youth with behavior and drug problems. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: BSFT or group treatment control (GC). Measures used include the Revised Behavior Problem Checklist (RBPC), the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), the Family Environment Scale (FES), and the Structural Family Systems Rating (SFSR). Results indicated that compared to GC cases, BSFT cases showed significantly greater preintervention to postintervention improvement in parent reports of adolescent conduct problems and delinquency, adolescent reports of marijuana use, and observer ratings and self-reports of family functioning. On all three presenting problems targeted in this study (i.e., conduct problems, peer-based delinquency, and self-reported drug use), BSFT was significantly more efficacious than the GC. For example, in the BSFT condition, 41% who had been using at intake were no longer using at termination of treatment, compared to 13% in the GC condition. Limitations include the lack of follow-up assessments, that termination assessments were conducted only with cases that completed treatment, and that a substantial proportion of treatment completers did not have complete observational data.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Horigian, V. E., Feaster, D. J., Robbins, M. S., Brincks, A. M., Ucha, J., Rohrbaugh, M. J., Shoham, V., Bachrach, K., Miller, M., Burlew, A. K., Hodgkins, C. C., Carrion, I. S., Silverstein, M., Werstlein, R., & Szapocznik, J. (2015). A cross-sectional assessment of the long term effects of Brief Strategic Family Therapy for adolescent substance use. The American Journal on Addictions, 24(7), 637–645. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajad.12278

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — Adolescents: Mean=16.01 years; Parents: Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adolescents: 44.3% Hispanic, 30.8% non Hispanic White, 22.9% Black/African American, and 2% Other; Parents: Not specified
  • Gender — Adolescents: 78.5% Male; Parents: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were parents and adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers.

Location/Institution: La Frontera (Tucson, AZ), The Crossroads Center (Cincinnati, OH), The Village (Miami, FL), Gateway Community Center (Jacksonville, FL), Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA: Bayamón, Puerto Rico), Daymark Recovery Services (Salisbury, NC), Tarzana Treatment Centers (Tarzana, CA), and Arapahoe House (Denver, CO)

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
This study uses the same sample as Robbins et al. (2011). The purpose of this study was to examine long-term outcomes of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) in the rates of drug use, number of arrests, and externalizing behaviors in young adults who were randomized into treatment conditions as adolescents. This paper uses data from the BSFT effectiveness study conducted in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Families were randomly assigned to BSFT or TAU for the treatment of drug abuse in eight outpatient community treatment centers across the country. Measures utilized include the Timeline Follow Back interview (TLFB) and the Adult Self Report. Results found compared with TAU, BSFT youth reported lower incidence of lifetime and past year arrests; lower rates of lifetime and past year incarcerations; and lower scores on externalizing behaviors at follow-up. Limitations include variability in length of time between participation in the study and the long-term assessment time point, relying on self-reports may have resulted in underreporting when assessing substance use and criminal history, and it is not possible in a long-term follow-up to rule out factors other than intervention condition that could have affected outcomes therefore, no direct causal influences could be concluded.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 4.7 years.

Robbins, M. S., Feaster, D. J., Horigian, V. E., Rohrbaugh, M., Shoham, V., Bachrach, K., Miller, M., Burlew, K. A., Hodgkins, C., Carrion, I., Vandermark, N., Schindler, E., Werstlein, R., & Szapocznik, J. (2011). Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus treatment as usual: Results of a multisite randomized trial for substance using adolescents. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(6), 713–727. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0025477

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — 13-17 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 213 Hispanic, 148 White, 110 Non-Hispanic Black, 5 American Indians/Alaskans, 2 Japanese/Whites, 1 Persian, and 1 Lebanese
  • Gender — 377 Male and 103 Female
  • Status — Participants were adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers.

Location/Institution: La Frontera (Tucson, AZ), The Crossroads Center (Cincinnati, OH), The Village (Miami, FL), Gateway Community Center (Jacksonville, FL), Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA: Bayamón, Puerto Rico), Daymark Recovery Services (Salisbury, NC), Tarzana Treatment Centers (Tarzana, CA), and Arapahoe House (Denver, CO)

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Measures used were the Timeline Follow-Back, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, the Parenting Practices Questionnaire, and Family Environmental Scale. Results indicate that no overall differences between conditions were observed in the trajectories of self-reports of adolescent drug use. However, the median number of days of self-reported drug use was significantly higher in TAU then BSFT at the final observation point. BSFT was significantly more effective than TAU in engaging, and retaining family members in treatment and in improving parent reports of family functioning. Limitations include low rates in self-reported drug use at baseline and over the course of the study.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 1- 9 months (3-4 month intervention; 4-, 8-, 12-month follow-ups postrandomization).

Horigian, V. E., Weems, C. F., Robbins, M. S., Feaster, D. J., Ucha, J., Miller, M., & Werstlein, R. (2013). Reductions in anxiety and depression symptoms in youth receiving substance use treatment. The American Journal on Addictions, 22(4), 329–337. https://doi.org//10.1111/j.1521-0391.2013.12031.x

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — Adolescents: Mean=15.4 years; Parents: Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adolescents: 78.5% Male; Parents: Not specified
  • Gender — Adolescents: 44% Hispanic, 31% Caucasian, 23% African American, and 2% Other; Parents: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were parents and adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers.

Location/Institution: La Frontera (Tucson, AZ), The Crossroads Center (Cincinnati, OH), The Village (Miami, FL), Gateway Community Center (Jacksonville, FL), Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA: Bayamón, Puerto Rico), Daymark Recovery Services (Salisbury, NC), Tarzana Treatment Centers (Tarzana, CA), and Arapahoe House (Denver, CO)

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
This study uses the same sample as Robbins et al. (2011). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) by examining the reductions in anxiety and depression symptoms in drug using adolescents receiving substance abuse treatment in a multisite randomized study conducted in eight community treatment agencies. This paper uses data from the BSFT effectiveness study conducted in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Families were randomly assigned to BSFT or treatment as usual (TAU) for the treatment of drug abuse in eight outpatient community treatment centers across the country. Measures utilized include the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Predictive Scales (DISC-PS). Results indicate that significant reduction of anxiety and depressive symptoms and significant reductions in probable anxiety and depression diagnoses were observed at follow-up. Few differences by treatment type and by ethnic group were noticed. Limitations include the study relied on a measure of probability of diagnoses (the DISC-PS); the data were collected at only two time points, baseline and 12-month postrandomization, only allowing a pretest–posttest examination; this study did not include a randomized control group that received no intervention, the control group for this study (TAU) also improved; the family therapies, and in particular BSFT, have yet to be proven efficacious in the treatment of anxiety or depressive disorder in youth; and 34% of the sample was lost to follow-up.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 9 months.

Horigian, V. E., Feaster, D. J., Brincks, A., Robbins, M. S., Perez, M. A., & Szapocznik, J. (2015). The effects of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) on parent substance use and the association between parent and adolescent substance use. Addictive Behaviors, 42, 44–50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.10.024

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 480

Population:

  • Age — Adolescents: Mean=15.47 years, Parents: Mean=43 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Adolescents: 44% Hispanic, 31% Caucasian, and 23% African American, and 9% Other; Parents: Not specified
  • Gender — Adolescents: 79% Male and 21% Female, Parents: 85% Female and15% Male
  • Status — Participants were parents and adolescents referred for drug abuse treatment at community treatment centers.

Location/Institution: La Frontera (Tucson, AZ), The Crossroads Center (Cincinnati, OH), The Village (Miami, FL), Gateway Community Center (Jacksonville, FL), Administración de Servicios de Salud Mental y Contra la Adicción (ASSMCA: Bayamón, Puerto Rico), Daymark Recovery Services (Salisbury, NC), Tarzana Treatment Centers (Tarzana, CA), and Arapahoe House (Denver, CO)

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
This study uses the same sample as Robbins et al. (2011). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) on parent substance use, and the relationship between parent substance use and adolescent substance use. This paper uses data from the BSFT effectiveness study conducted in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Participants were randomized to BSFT or treatment as usual (TAU) across eight outpatient treatment programs community treatment programs across the country. Adolescent substance use was assessed at baseline and at 12 monthly follow-up assessments. All additional adolescent and family assessments were completed at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 months postrandomization. Parent alcohol and drug use were assessed at baseline and at 12 months postrandomization. Measures utilized include the Alcohol and Drug Use items from the Addiction Severity Index-Lite (ASI), the Timeline Follow Back (TLFB), C-Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, Substance Abuse/Dependence Module (DISC-SA), Parenting Practices Questionnaire, and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-Predictive Scales (DISC-PS). Results found parents in BSFT significantly decreased their alcohol use as measured by the ASI composite score from baseline to 12 months. Change in family functioning mediated the relationship between treatment condition and change in parent alcohol use. Children of parents who reported drug use at baseline had three times as many days of reported substance use at baseline compared with children of parents who did not use or only used alcohol. Adolescents of parents who used drugs at baseline in the BSFT group had a significantly lower trajectory of substance use than adolescents in the TAU group. Limitations include that the study only assessed parents at baseline and at 12 months postrandomization, allowing only a pretest–posttest examination; high attrition rate; and TAU consisted of an array of services, including nonmanualized family therapy.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 9 months.

Additional References

Anderson, A. R., Horigian, V. E., Muir, J., & Szapocznik, J. (2019). Brief Strategic Family Therapy: A systematic approach to addressing emerging clinical challenges across 40 years of model development. In B. H. Fiese, M. Celano, K. Deater-Deckard, E. N. Jouriles, & M. A. Whisman (Eds.), APA handbooks in psychology®. APA handbook of contemporary family psychology: Family therapy and training (pp. 123–138). American Psychological Association. https://doi.org/10.1037/0000101-008

Horigian, V. E., Feaster, D. J., Brincks, A., Robbins, M. S., Perez, M. A., & Szapocznik, J. (2014). The effects of Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) on parent substance use and the association between parent and adolescent substance use. Addictive Behaviors, 42, 44-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.10.024

Santisteban, D., Suarez-Morales, L., Robbins, M., & Szapocznik, J. (2006). Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Lessons learned in efficacy research and challenges to blending research and practice. Family Process, 45(2), 259–271. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1545-5300.2006.00094.x

Contact Information

Jose Szapocznik, PhD
Agency/Affiliation: University of Miami Brief Strategic Family Therapy® Institute
Website: www.bsft.org
Email:
Phone: (305) 243-7585
Olga Hervis, MSW, LCSW
Agency/Affiliation: Family Therapy Training Institute of Miami
Website: brief-strategic-family-therapy.com
Email:
Phone: (305) 859-2121

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: October 2020

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: May 2021

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: April 2010