Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC)

About This Program

Target Population: Children and adolescents between the ages of 5 and 15 with anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and/or traumatic stress and their caregivers

For children/adolescents ages: 5 – 15

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 5 – 15

Program Overview

MATCH-ADTC is a protocol that organizes modular manualized practices for childhood anxiety, depression, trauma, and disruptive behavior problems. The program combines 33 procedures into a single, flexible system and uses expert-designed flowcharts to organize the treatment plan to fit a child’s needs while fostering individualization to address comorbidity or therapeutic roadblocks. The protocol provides clear step-by-step instructions, activities, example scripts, time-saving tips, monitoring forms, and easy-to-read explanatory handouts and worksheets for individual sessions with children and their caregivers. Caregiver handouts are available in English, German, and Spanish.

Program Goals

The goals of Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) are to:

For children & adolescents:

  • Increase positive functioning and adaptive skills.
  • Reduce the top concerns identified by both self and caregiver(s).
  • Reduce mental health symptoms related to anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and traumatic stress.

For caregivers:

  • Increase skills to effectively managing the youth’s behaviors.
  • Learn techniques to help reduce top concerns for your youth’s behaviors.
  • Learn techniques to help reduce your youth’s mental health symptoms.

Logic Model

The program representative did not provide information about a Logic Model for Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC).

Essential Components

The essential components of Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) include:

  • MATCH-ADTC is a modular approach to treatment.
  • The modules are referenced by flowcharts that select and arrange them according to guiding algorithms for anxiety, depression, conduct problems, and traumatic stress.
  • The treatment modules include:
    • Getting Acquainted
    • Learning Depression-Child
    • Learning Depression-Parent
    • Problem Solving
    • Activity Selection
    • Getting Acquainted
    • Fear Ladder
    • Learning Anxiety-Child
    • Learning Anxiety-Parent
    • Practicing
    • Safety Planning
    • Learning to Relax
    • Trauma Narrative
    • Maintenance
    • Cognitive STOP
    • Quick Calming
    • Presenting a Positive Self
    • Cognitive BLUE
    • Cognitive TLC
    • Plans for Coping
    • Wrap Up
    • Engaging Parents
    • Learning about Behavior
    • One-on-One Time
    • Praise
    • Active Ignoring
    • Giving Effective Instructions
    • Rewards
    • Time Out
    • Making a Plan
    • Daily Report Card
    • Looking Ahead
    • Booster
  • Specific modules that specify caregivers as the target audience include:
    • Active Ignoring
    • Booster Session
    • Daily Report Card
    • Engaging Parent
    • Giving Effective Instructions
    • Learning About Behavior
    • Learning About Depression-Parent
    • Looking Ahead
    • Making a Plan
    • One-on-One Time
    • Praise
    • Time Out
  • Modules that specify the Family as the target audience and are implemented as a family session, when possible, include:
    • Fear Ladder
    • Rewards
    • Wrap Up
  • Providers implementing MATCH-ADTC will typically administer an indicated subset of these modules in an individual format to a youth and family, most commonly in outpatient, school-based, or home-based settings.
  • MATCH-ADTC emphasizes inclusion of the caregiver(s) with any of the four problem areas, but caregiver involvement around parenting practices is most pronounced when conduct problems/disruptive behavior is the primary focus.
  • In addition, while caregivers are the target audience of disruptive behavior modules and the interventions can be delivered without the youth, modules do include directions for integrating youth should they come to a session with a parent.
  • Caregivers are encouraged to understand and support their child’s application of skills.

Program Delivery

Child/Adolescent Services

Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Anxiety, depression, disruptive behavior, traumatic stress

Parent/Caregiver Services

Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Caregiver of youth with anxiety, depression, disruptive behavior, traumatic stress
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: Family sessions are included as indicated in the Essential Components section above. Teachers are involved as needed.

Recommended Intensity:

Weekly contacts for approximately one hour

Recommended Duration:

The program is designed to be complete when specific outcome criteria are met as opposed to a recommended duration. Average duration across various contexts varies, but it is typically around 7 months.

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Adoptive Home
  • Birth Family Home
  • Foster / Kinship Care
  • Outpatient Clinic
  • Community-based Agency / Organization / Provider
  • School Setting (Including: Day Care, Day Treatment Programs, etc.)
  • Virtual (Online, Telephone, Video, Zoom, etc.)

Homework

Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) includes a homework component:

Youth and caregivers are given regular assignments to build skills and apply them in developmentally appropriate situations.

Languages

Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) has materials available in languages other than English:

German, Spanish

For information on which materials are available in these languages, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

Typical service delivery capacity for community mental health organizations is needed. Computer access for providers is helpful, given that many prefer the online format of the program.

Manuals and Training

Prerequisite/Minimum Provider Qualifications

Sufficient credentials for therapeutic service delivery in a community mental health or child welfare system (e.g., Master’s level training in a behavioral health field).

Manual Information

There is a manual that describes how to deliver this program.

Program Manual(s)

The manual information is:

  • Chorpita, B. F., & Weisz, J. R. (2009). Modular approach to therapy for children with anxiety, depression, trauma, or conduct problems (MATCH-ADTC). PracticeWise.

It is available via the following sources:

Training Information

There is training available for this program.

Training Contacts:
Training Type/Location:

Online, at a trainee’s organization, or at a local/regional training location (e.g., hotel conference room)

Number of days/hours:

MATCH-ADTC Direct Service Training is provided by the three separate entities listed above.

The MATCH Professional Development Program offers training for those who wish to provide supervision, consultation, or training in the MATCH protocol. Credentialed models are available for MATCH Therapist, MATCH Supervisor, and MATCH Training Professional.

The MATCH Therapist Training and Consultation Series includes 40 hours of in-person training, online live training, or a hybrid of the two followed by a maximum of 25 one-hour consultations (# of required are 12 or 18 depending upon the training organization) for a minimum of 6 months, and a MATCH Therapist Portfolio Promotion Review.

Once a person has become a MATCH Therapist, they can become a MATCH Supervisor by completing a MATCH Supervisor Workshop Series. This series includes a 16-hour workshop (online and/or in person) followed by 6-12 hours of calls for a minimum of 6 months as the MATCH Supervisor-in-Training begins training others within their agency in MATCH. Successful completion of these requirements and a MATCH Supervisor Portfolio Promotion Review results in a MATCH Supervisor credential.

Custom training and consultation are also available.

Implementation Information

Pre-Implementation Materials

There are no pre-implementation materials to measure organizational or provider readiness for Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC).

Formal Support for Implementation

There is formal support available for implementation of Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) as listed below:

PracticeWise has a formal training division with nationally distributed personnel, as well as a consultation network for implementation support. An online support line is available for technical matters.

Judge Baker Children’s Center and John Weisz, Ph.D., also offer formal training and implementation support.

Fidelity Measures

There are fidelity measures for Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) as listed below:

There are fidelity checklists for specific clinical encounters (i.e., each session) built into the protocol materials, and there is a review process for examining fidelity of recorded sessions. These are available upon request.

Implementation Guides or Manuals

There are no implementation guides or manuals for Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC).

Implementation Cost

There are no studies of the costs of Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC).

Research on How to Implement the Program

Research has been conducted on how to implement Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) as listed below:

Bearman, S. K., Weisz, J. R., Chorpita, B. F., Hoagwood, K., Ward, A., Ugueto, A. M., Bernstein, A., & The Research Network on Youth Mental Health (2013). More practice, less preach? The role of supervision processes and therapist characteristics in EBP implementation. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 40, 518-529. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10488-013-0485-5

Palinkas , L. A., Schoenwald, S. K., Hoagwood, K., Landsverk, J., Chorpita, B. F., & Weisz, J. R. (2008). An ethnographic study of implementation of evidence-based treatments in child mental health: First steps. Psychiatric Services, 59(7), 738–746. https://doi.org/10.1176/ps.2008.59.7.738

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Weisz, J. R., Chorpita, B. F., Palinkas, L. A., Schoenwald, S. K., Miranda, J., Bearman, S. K., Daleiden, E. L., Ugueto, A. M., Ho, A., Martin, J., Gray, J., Alleyne, A., Langer, D. A., Southam-Gerow, M. A., Gibbons, R. D., & Research Network on Youth Men Testing standard and modular designs for psychotherapy with youth depression, anxiety, and conduct problems: A randomized effectiveness trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 69(3), 274–282. https://doi.org/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.147

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 174

Population:

  • Age — 7-13 years (Mean=10.59 years)
  • Race/Ethnicity — 45% White, 32% Multiethnic, 9% African American, 6% Latino/Latina, 4% Asian American/Pacific Islander, 2% other, and 2% did not choose to classify
  • Gender — 70% Male
  • Status — Participants were youth that sought outpatient care and had primary disorders or referral problems involving anxiety, depression, or disruptive conduct.

Location/Institution: Ten outpatient clinical service organizations in Massachusetts and Hawaii

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to compare standard/separate and modular/integrated arrangements of evidence-based treatments for depression, anxiety, and conduct problems in youth with usual care (UC). Practitioners were randomly assigned to 3 treatment conditions: modular (now called Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems [MATCH-ADTC]), standard (i.e., the use of 3 established EBTs for anxiety, depression, and conduct problems), or usual care. Measures utilized include the Brief Problem Checklist (BPC), the Top Problems Assessment (TPA), the Children’s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes, and the Services for Children and Adolescents–Parent Interview. Results indicate MATCH-ADTC produced significantly steeper trajectories of improvement than usual care and standard treatment on multiple Brief Problem Checklist and Top Problems Assessment measures. Youths receiving MATCH-ADTC treatment also had significantly fewer diagnoses than youths receiving usual care after treatment. In contrast, outcomes of standard manual treatment did not differ significantly from outcomes of usual care. Limitations include constraints on the level of analysis imposed by sample size, only those who sought treatment on their own were included, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Chorpita, B. F., Weisz, J. R., Daleiden, E. L., Schoenwald, S. K., Palinkas, L. A., Miranda, J., Higa-McMillan, C. K., Nakamura, B. J., Austin, A. A., Borntrager, C. F., Ward, A., Wells, K. C., Gibbons, R. D., & Research Network on Youth Mental Health (20 Long-term outcomes for the Child STEPs randomized effectiveness trial: A comparison of modular and standard treatment designs with usual care. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81(6), 999–1009. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0034200

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 174

Population:

  • Age — 7-13 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — 45% White, 32% multiethnic, 9% African American, 6% Latino/Latina, 4% Asian American/Pacific Islander, and 2% other
  • Gender — 70% Male
  • Status — Participants were children whose primary clinical concerns involved diagnoses or clinical elevations related to anxiety, depression, or disruptive behavior.

Location/Institution: Ten different outpatient community and school-based settings in Massachusetts and Hawaii

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
This study used the sample from Weisz et al. (2012). The purpose of the study was to report outcomes from the Child STEPs trial to gauge the longer-term impact of protocol design on the effectiveness of evidence-based treatment procedures. Community therapists were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 conditions: (a) standard, which involved the use of 1 or more of 3 manualized evidence-based treatments, (b) modular, which involved a single modular protocol (Modular Approach to Therapy for Children [MATCH] – [now called Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems [MATCH-ADTC]), and (c) usual care. Measures utilized include the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 6–18 (CBCL), the Youth Self-Report for Ages 11–18 (YSR), the Brief Impairment Scale (BIS), the Children’s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes, and the Services Assessment for Children and Adolescents–Brief Parent Version (SACA). Results indicate that the rate of improvement for youth in the MATCH condition was significantly better than those in usual care. On a measure of functional impairment, no significant differences were found among the 3 conditions. Analysis of service utilization also showed no significant differences among conditions, with almost half of youth receiving some additional services in the 1st year after beginning treatment, and roughly one third of youth in the 2nd year. Limitations include sample generalizability and inadequate power to test for higher order interactions (e.g., moderating effects of age, gender, ethnicity, therapist background, internalizing vs. externalizing problems), a sample characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity, and chosen measure of functioning was administered only at 1-year intervals.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: Varies but at least 12 months

Chorpita, B. F., Daleiden, E. L., Park, A. L., Ward, A. M., Levy, M. C., Cromley, T., Chiu, A. W., Letamendi, A. M., Tsai, K. H., & Krull, J. L. (2017). Child STEPs in California: A cluster randomized effectiveness trial comparing modular treatment with community implemented treatment for youth with anxiety, depression, conduct problems, or traumatic stress. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 85(1), 13–25. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000133

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 138

Population:

  • Age — Youth: 5-15 years (Mean=9.30 years), Parents: Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Youth: 78% Latino/a, 10% African American, 8% Multiethnic, and 4% Caucasian; Parents: Not specified
  • Gender — Youth: 55% Male, Parents: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were youth whose primary clinical concerns involved diagnoses or clinical elevations related to anxiety, depression, disruptive behavior, and/or traumatic stress.

Location/Institution: Three different community agencies in Los Angeles County and San Bernardino County

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to report outcomes testing modular treatment [now called Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC)] versus multiple community-implemented evidence-based treatments for youth. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: (a) modular treatment, which involved a single modular protocol (MATCH-ADTC) and (b) community-implemented treatment (CIT). Measures utilized include the Brief Problem Checklist (BPC), the Top Problems Assessment (TPA), the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales (RCADS), the University of California at Los Angeles Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index (UCLA PTSD Index), the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), the Services Assessment for Children and Adolescents (SACA), the Services for Children and Adolescents Parent Interview (SCAPI), and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. Results indicate youth treated with MATCH-ADTC showed significantly faster rates of improvement over time on clinical and functional outcomes relative to youth in the CIT condition and required significantly fewer sessions delivered over significantly fewer days. Caregiver-reported clinical improvement rates were significantly greater for MATCH-ADTC (60%) versus CIT (36.7%). Further, youth in the CIT condition were significantly more likely to receive additional psychosocial treatment services and were significantly more likely to use a variety of psychotropic medications during the active treatment phase. Limitations included the lack of study cases for which trauma was selected as the primary treatment focus, the current study was not a controlled test of alternative designs for evidence-based treatments, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Weisz, J. R., Bearman, S. K., Ugueto, A. M., Herren, J. A., Evans, S. C., Cheron, D. M., Alleyne, A. R., Weissman, A. S., Tweed, J. L., Pollack, A. A., Langer, D. A., Southam-Gerow, M. A., Wells, K. C., & Jensen-Doss, A. Testing robustness of Child STEPs effects with children and adolescents: A randomized controlled effectiveness trial. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 49(6), 883-896. https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2019.1655757

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 156 youth, 50 therapists

Population:

  • Age — Youth: 6-16 years (Mean=10.52 years), Therapists: Mean=43.36 years, Caregivers: Not specified
  • Race/Ethnicity — Youth: 80% Caucasian, 13% Multiracial, 5% Black, 2% Latino and 1% Other; Therapists: 40 White, 1 Hispanic, and 2 Other; Caregivers: Not specified
  • Gender — Youth: 48% Male; Therapists: 33 Female; Caregivers: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were youth with a primary problem or disorder of anxiety, depression, traumatic stress, and/or conduct problems.

Location/Institution: Three large outpatient community mental health clinics in urban, suburban, and rural areas

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to test robustness of beneficial effects found in two previous trials of the modular Child STEPs treatment program [now called Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC)]. Fifty community clinicians were randomly assigned to receive training and consultation in Child STEPs or to provide usual care (UC). Referred youths were randomly assigned to Child STEPs or UC. Measures utilized include the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), the CBCL/Youth Self Report, the Brief Problem Checklist (BPC), and the Top Problems Assessment. Results indicate participants in both groups showed statistically significant improvement on all measures, leading to clinically meaningful problem reductions. However, in contrast to previous trials, Child STEPs was not superior to UC on any measure. Limitations include the number of youths referred and randomized but never appeared for treatment, the absence of a third study condition, and power was diminished for smaller effects.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: 2 years.

Additional References

Palinkas, L. A., Weisz, J. R., Chorpita, B. F., Levine, B., Garland, A. F., Hoagwood, K. E., & Landsverk, J. (2013). Continued use of evidence-based treatments after a randomized controlled effectiveness trial: A qualitative study. Psychiatric Services, 64(11), 1110–1118. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.004682012

Weisz, J. R., & Chorpita, B. F. (2012). Mod squad for child psychotherapy: Restructuring evidence-based treatment for clinical practice. In P. C. Kendall (Ed.), Child and adolescent therapy: Cognitive-behavioral procedures (4th ed., pp. 379-397). Guilford.

Contact Information

Teri L. Bourdeau, PhD, ABPP
Title: Vice President of Training and Development
Agency/Affiliation: PracticeWise, LLC
Website: www.practicewise.com/portals/0/MATCH_public/index.html
Email:
Phone: (321) 426-4109
John Weisz, PhD, ABPP
Title: Professor
Agency/Affiliation: Harvard University
Department: Department of Psychology
Email:
Phone: (617) 877-7716
Daniel Cheron, PhD, ABPP
Title: Chief Psychologist
Agency/Affiliation: Harvard Medical School
Department: Judge Baker Children's Center
Email:

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: September 2021

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: December 2021

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: December 2021