The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV)

About This Program

Target Population: Families, specifically parents and their infants/toddlers ages 0 (during pregnancy) to 36 months, who present with risks that threaten the parent-child attachment relationship, and/or have environmental or familial concerns that place their children at risk for developing a variety of emotional, behavioral, social, and cognitive delays

For children/adolescents ages: 0 – 3

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 0 – 3

Program Overview

The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) is a needs-driven, relationship-focused intervention for parents and infants/toddlers aged 0 (pregnancy) to 36 months. IMH HV aims to meet the needs of families at high risk for relationship problems, child abuse and/or neglect, behavior issues and ongoing dependence on the mental health system. Families are eligible for IMH HV if either the parent or child have concerns that make them more susceptible to disruptions in the parent-child attachment relationship (e.g., parent mental health, child social-emotional and regulatory concerns). IMH HV is delivered weekly in families’ homes by Master’s-level providers. Through a multifaceted approach, IMH HV aims to increase parental competencies, promote mental health and sensitive caregiving, and thus reduce risk for the infant/toddler and lessen the probability of intergenerational transmission of the effects of unresolved loss and trauma in parents.

Program Goals

The goals of The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) are:

  • For children:
    • Increase likelihood of having secure and healthy attachment relationships with parent
    • Reduce the risk of developmental delays, relationship disturbances, and/or socio-emotional disorders
  • For parents:
    • Enhance caregiving competencies
    • Promote mental health and sensitive caregiving
    • Increase likelihood of providing a secure and healthy attachment with infant/toddler

Logic Model

View the Logic Model for The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV).

Essential Components

The essential components of The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) include:

  • Services delivered in families’ homes:
    • Focus on parent-child relationship
    • Parent and child are seen together
    • Can include multiple primary caregivers, including therapeutic contact with biological parents, foster parents, and/or kin with parenting roles
    • Typically lasts 90-120 minutes weekly
    • Frequency of visits driven by family-need with the potential for more frequent visits during a crisis
    • Parent and child are seen together
  • Multifaceted and needs-driven intervention:
    • Guided by the unique needs and situation of each family
    • Addresses needs of child welfare involved families
    • Duration of treatment dependent on the needs of the family
  • Core intervention components include:
    • Building an alliance or working relationship between provider and parent
    • Providing for material needs, advocacy, and health care
    • Developing social support, problem-solving skills, and life course planning
    • Providing emotional support
    • Providing development guidance
    • Culturally responsive & diversity-informed practice
    • Use of videotaping for assessment and ongoing review with families
    • Grounding in infant-parent psychotherapy:
      • Exploring child’s emotional experience in relation to current or past experiences
      • Wondering with the parent about the emotional content or meaning of a child’s play or behavior and/or speak to the infant or toddler about the emotional content or meaning of play or behavior
      • Acknowledging or discussing parent’s perceptions and representations of child and/or self as parent
      • Exploring parent’s capacity to nurture and respond to child
      • Exploring or linking current issues or conflicts to parent’s responses to child or relationship
      • Focus on parent emotion regarding child
      • Addressing negative experiences and/or unresolved loss/trauma that may be affecting the parent-child relationship
      • Addressing and supporting positive internal resources that may strengthen relationship with child
  • Reflective supervision:
    • Providers should receive regular reflective supervision, typically by supervisor within their agency and/or clinician consultant, to explore the emotional content of IMH HV work
    • Explores the relationship between parent and infant/toddler, parent and provider, provider, and supervisor

Program Delivery

Child/Adolescent Services

The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) directly provides services to children/adolescents and addresses the following:

  • Disruptions and/or disturbances in primary attachment relationships; developmental delays; socio-emotional or behavioral problems or disorders related to the impact of neglect, abuse, separations, domestic violence, medical vulnerabilities, and/or lack of resources and/or emotional/behavioral outcomes associated with being parented by an adult with reduced capacity (e.g., due to mental health concerns or other familial/environmental stressors

Parent/Caregiver Services

The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) directly provides services to parents/caregivers and addresses the following:

  • Disruptions and/or disturbances in primary attachment relationships, and/or reduced caregiving capacity and responsiveness related to the impact of past trauma, or stress/adversity, and/or a range of behavioral and/or environmental concerns that impact parenting and the child-parent relationship including unresolved loss, mental health issues (i.e., depression, anxiety), domestic violence, economic deprivation, systemic oppression, and lack of social support
Services Involve Family/Support Structures:

This program involves the family or other support systems in the individual's treatment: The needs and contributions of significant adults (including other parents who are not direct recipients of services) and other young children in the household are considered and included in the IMH HV intervention. This may include biological parents, foster parents, and/or kin; and may also involve coordination of care with child welfare system providers, medical providers, early care and education providers, and other professionals involved in support for the infant/toddler and/or family.

Recommended Intensity:

Typically, one 90- to 120-minute weekly session in the infant/toddler and family’s home; can be more frequent depending on family need

Recommended Duration:

Duration of services varies based on factors, including family need and age of the child; may last from pregnancy until infant/toddler age 36 months

Delivery Settings

This program is typically conducted in a(n):

  • Adoptive Home
  • Birth Family Home
  • Foster / Kinship Care
  • Shelter (Domestic Violence, Homeless, etc.)
  • Virtual (Online, Telephone, Video, Zoom, etc.)

Homework

This program does not include a homework component.

Languages

The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) has materials available in languages other than English:

Chinese, Spanish

For information on which materials are available in these languages, please check on the program's website or contact the program representative (contact information is listed at the bottom of this page).

Resources Needed to Run Program

The typical resources for implementing the program are:

  • Cell phones
  • Computer and telecommunication capabilities (equipment and software should be HIPAA-compliant and accessible to clients)
  • Method of transportation to/from home and/or travel expense reimbursement
  • Ability to record video (e.g., cell phone, video recorder)
  • Adequate space for reflective supervision, or phone/telecommunication capabilities
  • Master’s level clinician and reflective supervisor/consultant
  • Toys and materials to support developmental guidance and infant-parent psychotherapy components
  • Assessment tools

Manuals and Training

Prerequisite/Minimum Provider Qualifications

For service providers, minimum qualifications include master's degree in social work, psychology or a related field and meet any local state, and/or agency licensing requirements. Providers should also have training in infancy and toddlerhood, early relationship development, and mental health intervention techniques. Clinicians and should have a foundation in culturally responsive practices, impacts of trauma, infant, and child development, parent mental health, attachment theory, child temperament, and interpersonal skills. It is assumed that clinicians and supervisors will have completed master’s degree level training, including course work in psychotherapy skills and practices, and that they will have engaged in additional learning to address foundational topics. IMH HV providers are expected to obtain or be working toward endorsement as an Infant Mental Health Specialist.

For supervisors, minimum qualifications include master’s degree in social work, psychology or a related field. Additionally, administrative, organizational, and clinical skills and prior experience as an IMH HV Home Visitor is preferred. Must meet any local, state, and/or agency licensing requirements. Supervisors should have a foundation in culturally responsive practices, impacts of trauma, infant and child development, parent mental health, attachment theory, child temperament, and interpersonal skills. It is assumed that clinicians and supervisors will have completed masters-level training, including course work in psychotherapy skills and practices, and that they will have engaged in additional learning to address foundational topics. Supervisors are expected to obtain or be working toward endorsement as an Infant Mental Health Mentor.

Manual Information

There is a manual that describes how to deliver this program.

Program Manual(s)

Program Manual Information:

  • Weatherston, D., & Tableman, B. (2015). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting: Supporting competencies/reducing risks, manual for early attachments: IMH Home Visiting (3rd edition). Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health. This manual is available for purchase from the Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health at https://mi-aimh.org/store/imhmanual/.

Training Information

There is training available for this program.

Training Contact:
Training Type/Location:

Training is delivered via in-person training sessions and bi-weekly phone (or virtual) coaching calls that include case presentations.to provide clinicians and their supervisors with tools and skills to deliver IMH HV. Provision of ongoing reflective supervision from supervisors/consultants to providers is a requirement for participation. Additional ongoing training opportunities are regularly provided by the Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health and the Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health (MI-AIMH), which also has an endorsement program.

Number of days/hours:

Training is delivered across 12-months through 7 days of in-person training sessions and bi-weekly phone (or virtual) coaching calls that include case presentations. Both providers and supervisors participate in training activities.

Implementation Information

Pre-Implementation Materials

There are pre-implementation materials to measure organizational or provider readiness for The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) as listed below:

Providers are given a formal structured Self-Assessment of Readiness tool as part of their initial training preparation. This self-assessment tool reviews each participant’s foundational knowledge to identify areas of strength and for growth in the following domains: attachment, case management, child development, culturally informed care, depression, foundations in infant mental health concepts and assessment, and trauma. Providers complete the self-assessment and review scores with their supervisor to determine whether the training is an appropriate fit, or if more background, experience and/or learning in foundational knowledge for the IMH HV model would be best before pursuing this opportunity. The self-assessment tool also includes suggested further reading for each domain. For more information, please contact the program representative (see bottom of the page).

Formal Support for Implementation

There is formal support available for implementation of The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) as listed below:

Coaching calls provide implementation support throughout the training period.

Fidelity Measures

There are fidelity measures for The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) as listed below:

Fidelity to the IMH HV model is assessed through a self-rated IMH HV Treatment Fidelity Checklist. Use of the fidelity tool is included in the standard model training curriculum. The adapted fidelity checklist includes broad categories representing key IMH HV strategies. Within each category are items that provide specific activities or examples of possible interventions. Providers are asked to select all applicable items that reflect what they did during each home visit. The fidelity checklist can be used to support clinical practice by identifying the broad categories of strategies or interventions that have been employed, as well as to help guide attention to core components and/or specific strategies that have, or have not, been used in the work with the family. This checklist is meant to be used in reflective supervision as part of case conceptualizations and treatment planning.

Implementation Guides or Manuals

There are implementation guides or manuals for The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) as listed below:

Infant Mental Health Home Visiting has a manual that offers an overview of principles and practices of infant mental health, referral procedural home visiting processes, assessment and intervention strategies, termination planning, special circumstances, administrative and organizational issues, staff training and supervision, and a case example. Tables supporting intervention structures, anecdotal materials, and an appendix with forms for carrying out relationship centered work with infants/toddlers under 3 and their caregivers guide infant mental health home visitors in their practice are included. The final piece includes suggested guidelines for training and an outline for psychotherapy training. The manual’s framework includes components for service: building an alliance, material needs, emotional support, developmental guidance, life-coping skills and social supports, and infant-parent psychotherapy. The manual is available for purchase from the Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health at https://mi-aimh.org/store/imhmanual/:

  • Weatherston, D., & Tableman, B. (2015). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting: Supporting competencies/reducing risks, manual for early attachments: IMH Home Visiting (3rd edition). Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

Implementation Cost

There are no studies of the costs of The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV).

Research on How to Implement the Program

Research has been conducted on how to implement The Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) as listed below:

  • Huth-Bocks, A. C., Jester, J. M., Stacks, A. M., Muzik, M., Rosenblum, K. L., & Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research (2020). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting therapists' fidelity to the Michigan IMH-HV model in community practice settings. Infant Mental Health Journal, 41(2), 206–219. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21839
  • Lawler, J. M., Rosenblum, K. L., Muzik, M., Ludtke, M., Weatherston, D. J., & Tableman, B. (2017). A collaborative process for evaluating Infant Mental Health Home Visiting in Michigan. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.C.), 68(6), 535–538. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201700047
  • Shea, S. E., Jester, J. M., Huth-Bocks, A. C., Weatherston, D. J., Muzik, M., Rosenblum, K. L., & Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research (2020). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting therapists' reflective supervision self-efficacy in community practice settings. Infant Mental Health Journal, 41(2), 191–205. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21834

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Stacks, A. M., Barron, C. C., & Wong, K. (2019). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting in the context of an infant-toddler court team: Changes in parental responsiveness and reflective functioning. Infant Mental Health Journal, 40(4), 523–540. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21785

Type of Study: One-group pretest–posttest study
Number of Participants: 30 (16 parents and 14 children)

Population:

  • Age — Parents: 16–32 years (Mean=21.69 years); Children: 7–32 months (Mean=18.57 months)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Parents: 12 Black and 4 White; Children: 11 Black, 2 White, and 1 Multiracial
  • Gender — Parents: 11 Female; Children: 7 Female
  • Status — Participants were individuals involved in the child welfare system.

Location/Institution: Michigan

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to describe Baby Court, an infant–toddler court team in Michigan, the community-based participatory research approach to the implementation evaluation, and the resulting changes in parenting. All parents and infants who participate in Baby Court are referred for Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) services and assigned to a court-team therapist. Measures utilized include the Crowell Caregiver-Child Structured Interaction Procedure and Coding system and the Parent Development Interview–Revised Short Form (PDI-R2-SF). Results indicate that there were improvements in parents’ responsiveness, positive affect, and reflective functioning, with moderate effects. Higher risk parents demonstrated significant changes in reflective functioning, as compared to those at lower risk. Limitations include the small sample size, lack of control group, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Rosenblum, K. L., Muzik, M., Jester, J. M., Huth-Bocks, A., Erickson, N., Ludtke, M., Weatherston, D., Brophy-Herb, H., Tableman, B., Alfafara, E., Waddell, R., & the Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research. (2020). Community-delivered infant-parent psychotherapy improves maternal sensitive caregiving: Evaluation of the Michigan model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting. Infant Mental Health Journal, 41(2), 178–190. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21840

Type of Study: One-group pretest–posttest study
Number of Participants: 158 (78 mothers and 80 children)

Population:

  • Age — Parents: Mean=27.1 years; Children: Mean=9.8 months
  • Race/Ethnicity — Parents: 55% White, 45% Black/African American, 5% Hispanic/Latina, 4% American Indian/Alaskan Native, and 1% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander; Children: Not specified
  • Gender — Parents: 78 Female; Children: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were Medicaid-eligible families through county or regional community mental health service programs.

Location/Institution: Michigan

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based psychotherapeutic Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) intervention for enhancing parenting sensitivity; a secondary aim was to evaluate whether the use of video feedback was associated with greater treatment response. Measures utilized include the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire (ACEs), and the Intimate Partner Violence Screener. Results indicate that there was a dose–response relationship between number of sessions and maternal sensitivity, and that video review with parents independently contributed to improved maternal sensitivity. Limitations include the small sample size, lack of control group, evaluators were not blind to assessment time point, the delivery of video review was not standardized as part of the intervention service nor was it required per study protocol, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Stacks, A. M., Wong, K., Barron, C., & Ryznar, T. (2020). Permanency and well-being outcomes for maltreated infants: Pilot results from an infant–toddler court team. Child Abuse & Neglect, 101, Article 104332. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2019.104332

Type of Study: One-group pretest–posttest study
Number of Participants: 25 parent–child dyads

Population:

  • Age — Parents: 16 years; Children: Mean=17.48–24.71 months
  • Race/Ethnicity — Parents:12 Black and 4 White; Children: 22 Black, 2 White, and 1 Multiracial
  • Gender — Parents: 11 Female; Children: 11 Female
  • Status — Participants were infants and toddlers under court jurisdiction for substantiated maltreatment and their parents.

Location/Institution: Wayne County, Michigan's Baby Court

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to describe baseline development for a small group of infants and toddlers participating in the Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) intervention, to explore changes in their development and behavior, and to describe permanency outcomes for enhancing parenting sensitivity; a secondary aim was to evaluate whether the use of video feedback was associated with greater treatment response. Measures utilized include the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd Ed. (Bayley-III), and the Crowell Caregiver-Child Structured Interaction Procedure and Coding System. Results indicate that thirty-five percent of children had a developmental delay at program entry and showed significant improvements in expressive language development. Increases in prosocial behavior were seen in domains of positive affect and enthusiasm and significant reductions in child withdrawal. More than two-thirds of children were reunified with their parent(s) and they spent an average of 18.7 months in out-of- home care. Limitations include the small sample size; lack of control group; demographic, permanency, and well-being data for children in Wayne County are not available, and therefore it is impossible to determine whether this sample is similar to the larger group of children in the county; and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Julian, M. M., Muzik, M., Jester, J. M., Handelzalts, J., Erickson, N., Stringer, M., Brophy-Herb, H., Ribaudo, J., Huth-Bocks, A., Lawler, J., Stacks, A., Rosenblum, K. L., & the Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research. (2021). Relationships heal: Reducing harsh parenting and child abuse potential with relationship-based parent-infant home visiting. Children and Youth Services Review, 128, Article 106135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2021.106135

Type of Study: One-group pretest–posttest study
Number of Participants: 128 (76 mother and infants/toddler dyads, and 52 clinicians)

Population:

  • Age — Caregiver: 17.8–53.7 years (Mean=27.2 years); Children: 0-28 months (Mean=9.9 months)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Caregiver: 55% White, 45% Black/African American, 4% Hispanic/Latina, 4% American Indian/Alaskan Native, and 1% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander; Children: Not specified
  • Gender — Caregiver: 100% Female; Children: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were mothers and their children who were enrolled in Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) delivered by community mental health therapists.

Location/Institution: Wayne County, Michigan's Baby Court

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to examine associations between participation in the Michigan Model of Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) and both harsh parenting and child abuse potential. Measures utilized include the Brief Child Abuse Potential Inventory (BCAP) and the Home Observation of Measurement of the Environment (HOME). Results indicate that mothers with higher numbers of IMH HV visits showed lower levels of observed harsh parenting over the three time points in the study. In addition, higher cumulative societal factors associated with oppression (SFAO) predicted higher harsh parenting over the three time points. A higher number of IMH HV visits also predicted lower child abuse potential across the time points of the study, controlling for SFAO. Limitations include the small sample size, lack of control group, lack of a true baseline as the baseline assessment occurred soon after the initiation of IMH HV treatment, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Riggs, J. L., Rosenblum, K. L., Muzik, M., Jester, J., Freeman, S., Huth-Bocks, A., Waddell, R., Alfafara, E., Miller, A., Lawler, J., Erickson, N., Weatherston, D., Shah, P., Brophy-Herb, H., & Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research. (2 022). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting mitigates impact of maternal adverse childhood experiences on toddler language competence: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 43(4), e227–e236. https://doi.org/10.1097/DBP.0000000000001020

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 62 mother–infant/toddler dyads

Population:

  • Age — Mothers: 19–44 years (Mean=31.91 years); Children: Prenatal–26 months (Mean=12.06 months)
  • Race/Ethnicity — Mothers: 73% White and 37% African-American; Children: 73% White, 37% Black, 12% Hispanic/Latino, 7% American Indian, 6% Arab/Arab American, and 6% Asian/Pacific Islander
  • Gender — Mothers: 100% Female; Children: Not specified
  • Status — Participants were individuals contacted through flyers posted in the community, referred from providers, or were contacted from a registry of women who recently gave birth and consented to learning more about research studies.

Location/Institution: Michigan

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to test the efficacy of an Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) treatment on impact of maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on subsequent child language competence. Participants were randomized to IMH HV or control (treatment as usual). Measures utilized include the Adverse Childhood Experience (ACES) Test and the Preschool Language Scales–Fifth Edition Screening Test (PLS-5 Screening Test). Results indicate that the maternal ACE score predicted child language competence. This effect was moderated by treatment indicating no association between maternal ACEs and child language for those randomized to IMH HV. Limitations include the small sample size, relied exclusively on maternal caregivers, limiting generalizability, did not collect data about other languages spoken in the home, reliance on retrospective reports of childhood adversity, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Stacks, A. M., Jester, J. M., Wong, K., Huth-Bocks, A., Brophy-Herb, H., Lawler, J., Riggs, J., Ribaudo, J., Muzik, M., & Rosenblum, K. L. (2022). Infant Mental Health Home Visiting: Intervention dosage and therapist experience interact to support improvements in maternal reflective functioning. Attachment & Human Development, 24(1), 53–75. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2020.1865606

Type of Study: One-group pretest–posttest study
Number of Participants: 141 (75 mother–child dyads and 51 clinicians)

Population:

  • Age — Mothers: Mean=26.67 years; Children: Mean=9.64 months
  • Race/Ethnicity — Mothers: 57% White, 43% Black; Children: Not specified
  • Gender — Mothers: 100% Female; Children: 56% Female
  • Status — Participants were mothers and their children who were enrolled in Infant Mental Health Home Visiting (IMH HV) delivered by community mental health therapists.

Location/Institution: Wayne County, Michigan's Baby Court

Summary: (To include basic study design, measures, results, and notable limitations)
The purpose of the study was to examine changes in parental reflective functioning (PRF) among mothers enrolled in Infant Mental Health-Home Visiting (IMH HV) and explore whether parental risk, treatment dosage or therapist experience predicted change in PRF. Measures utilized include the Pregnancy Interview (PI) or the Parent Development Interview- Revised Short Version (PDI), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Results indicate that maternal demographic and psychosocial risk, therapist experience, and treatment dosage were not directly associated with changes in PRF. However, mothers who received more treatment sessions from therapists with six or more years of experience demonstrated the greatest improvements in PRF, while mothers who received more treatment sessions from therapists who had been practicing IMH HV for less than 15 months showed a decline in PRF. Limitations include the small sample size, lack of control group, and lack of follow-up.

Length of controlled postintervention follow-up: None.

Additional References

Lawler, J. M., Rosenblum, K. L., Muzik, M., Ludtke, M., Weatherston, D. J., & Tableman, B. (2017). A collaborative process for evaluating infant mental health home visiting in Michigan. Psychiatric Services, 68(6), 535–538. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201700047

Tableman, B., & Ludtke, M. (2020). Introduction to the special section: The development of infant mental health home visiting in Michigan state government. Infant Mental Health Journal, 41(2), 163–165. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21855

Weatherston, D. J., Ribaudo, J., & Michigan Collaborative for Infant Mental Health Research (2020). The Michigan infant mental health home visiting model. Infant Mental Health Journal, 41(2), 166–177. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21838

Contact Information

Mary Ludtke, MA
Agency/Affiliation: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services
Email:
Maria Muzik, MD MS
Agency/Affiliation: University of Michigan
Email:
Katherine Rosenblum, PhD
Agency/Affiliation: University of Michigan
Email:

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: March 2022

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: October 2022

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: November 2022