ParentCorps

Note: The ParentCorps program was not responsive to the CEBC's inquiry. The following information was obtained from publicly available sources.

About This Program

Target Population: Not Specified

Program Overview

ParentCorps is an enhancement to pre-K programs that includes three components, which work synergistically to bolster parent and teacher capacity to support children's early learning and development in the face of adversity --including poverty, racism, discrimination, and immigration-related stress.

One component of ParentCorps - a three-component model - is Parenting Program. Parenting Program is designed to help families support children's social-emotional learning and school success. In a culturally relevant and affirming learning environment, parents connect, share their experiences, and explore parenting practices they may choose to incorporate at home, in alignment with their values and beliefs.

Education and Training

Education and Training Resources

Publicly available information indicates there is a manual that describes how to deliver this program, and there is some training available for this program.
See contact info below.

Relevant Published, Peer-Reviewed Research

Child Welfare Outcome: Child/Family Well-Being

Brotman, L. M., Calzada, E., Huang, K. Y., Kingston, S., Dawson‐McClure, S., Kamboukos, D., Rosenfelt, A, Schwab, A., & Petkova, E. (2011) Promoting effective parenting practices and preventing child behavior problems in school among ethnically diverse families from underserved, urban communities. Child Development, 82(1), 258–276. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01554.x

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 171 families

Population:

  • Age — Caregivers: Mean=33.8 years; Children: Mean=4.14 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Caregivers: 85% Non-Latino Black (AfroCaribbean, African American); Children: 24% Latino, 20% AfroCaribbean; 19% African American, 13% White, 12% Asian, and 12% Mixed Race⁄Ethnicity
  • Gender — Caregivers: 89% Female and 11% Male; Children: 56% Female
  • Status — Participants were low-income minority children living in urban neighborhoods enrolled in prekindergarten.

Location/Institution: Eight public schools in one community school district in New York City

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study examines the efficacy of ParentCorps on effective parenting practices and child behavior problems in the Pre-K. The eight schools were randomly assigned to ParentCorps intervention (n = 4) or control (n = 4) conditions. Measures include the Parenting Practices Interview (PPI), the Effective Practices Test (EPT), the Global Impressions of Parent Child Interactions–Revised (GIPCI–R), the Behavior Assessment System for Children–Preschool Version (BASC), the New York Rating Scale (NYRS), the Involvement Questionnaire (INVOLVE–T), and the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning–3 (Speed DIAL–3). Results found ParentCorps resulted in significant benefits on effective parenting practices and teacher ratings of child behavior problems in school. ParentCorps effects were of similar magnitude for families at different levels of risk and for Black and Latino families. The number of sessions attended was related to improvements in parenting. Limitations include the relatively small sample size and low power to detect small effects once the nested nature of the data was taken into account, missing data on the observed measure of effective parenting practices, and cannot generalize findings to the entire Pre-K population.

Length of postintervention follow-up: None.

Dawson-McClure, S. R., Calzada, E. J., Huang, K. Y., Kamboukos, D., Rhule, D., Kolawole, B., Petkova, E., & Brotman, L. (2014). A population-level approach to promoting healthy child development and school success in low-income urban neighborhoods: Impact on parenting and child conduct problems. Prevention Science, 16, 279–290. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-014-0473-3

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 1,050

Population:

  • Age — Caregivers: Mean=33.9 years; Children: Mean=4.15 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Caregivers: 85% Non-Latino Black (AfroCaribbean, African American); Children: 680 (85.9%) Non-Latino black, 78 (9.8%) Latino, and 34 (4.3%) Other
  • Gender — Caregivers: 88% Female; Children: 518 Males (49.3%) and 532 Females (50.7%)
  • Status — Participants were low-income minority children living in urban neighborhoods enrolled in prekindergarten.

Location/Institution: Ten schools in two school districts in highly disadvantaged urban neighborhoods in New York City (NYC)

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study includes participants from Brotman et al. (2013). This study evaluated ParentCorps on parenting (e.g., knowledge, positive behavior support, behavior management, involvement in early learning) and child conduct problems over a 2-year period (end of kindergarten). Ten schools were randomly assigned to intervention (ParentCorps) or a “pre-kindergarten education as usual” control condition. Measures include the Parenting Practices Interview (PPI), the Effective Practices Test (EPT), the Involve Interview, the Parent Perceptions of Parent Efficacy (PPPE), and the New York Rating Scale (NYRS). Results found ParentCorps effects on knowledge, positive behavior support, and teacher-rated parent involvement in early learning. For the highest-risk families, ParentCorps also resulted in increased parent-rated involvement in early learning and decreased harsh and inconsistent behavior management. Among boys at high risk for problems based on baseline behavioral dysregulation, ParentCorps led to lower rates of conduct problems at age 6. Family-centered intervention at the transition to school has potential to improve population health and break the cycle of disadvantage for low-income, minority families. Limitations include the number of randomization units (schools) was small, increasing the potential for Type 1 error, reliance on self-reported measures, cannot completely eliminate the possibility of sample selection bias, 10% of the sample was Latino, and non-English speakers were excluded from the trial.

Length of postintervention follow-up: 2 years

Brotman, L. M., Dawson-McClure, S., Kamboukos, D., Keng-Yen, H., Calzada, E.J., & Petkova, E. (2016). Effects of ParentCorps in prekindergarten on child mental health and academic performance. follow-up of a randomized clinical trial through 8 years of age. JAMA Pediatrics, 170(12), 1149–1155. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.1891

Type of Study: Randomized controlled trial
Number of Participants: 1,050

Population:

  • Age — Caregivers: Mean=33.9 years; Children: Mean=4.15 years
  • Race/Ethnicity — Caregivers: 85% Non-Latino Black (AfroCaribbean, African American); Children: 680 (85.9%) Non-Latino black, 78 (9.8%) Latino, and 34 (4.3%) Other
  • Gender — Caregivers: 88% Female; Children: 518 Males (49.3%) and 532 Females (50.7%)
  • Status — Participants were low-income minority children living in urban neighborhoods enrolled in prekindergarten.

Location/Institution: Ten schools in two school districts in New York City

Summary: (To include comparison groups, outcomes, measures, notable limitations)
This study includes participants from Brotman et al. (2013). The purpose of this study was to examine whether ParentCorps delivered as an enhancement to prekindergarten programs in high-poverty urban schools leads to fewer mental health problems and increased academic performance in the early elementary school years. Schools were matched on size and split into pairs. Within each pair, one school was randomly assigned to intervention (ParentCorps) and the other to control. Measures utilized the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition, the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (KTEA) Brief Form, Second Edition, and the Speed Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning (DIAL). Results indicate relative to their peers in prekindergarten programs, children in ParentCorps-enhanced prekindergarten programs had lower levels of mental health problems and higher teacher-rated academic performance in second grade. Limitations include that the trial included a relatively small number of schools; that although there was no evidence that children who left study schools were different from those who remained, they may have differed on unmeasured characteristics; that despite randomization, the conditions differed with respect to baseline teacher ratings, which makes comparison between conditions more difficult; that it is possible that teacher ratings were biased; and that although careful examination of family participation revealed that a broad range of factors was not associated with dose (e.g., parental depression, ethnicity, and child school readiness).

Length of postintervention follow-up: 3 years

The following studies were not included in rating ParentCorps on the Scientific Rating Scale...

Brotman, L. M., Dawson-McClure, S., Calzada, E. J., Huang, K., Kamboukos, D., Palamar, J. J., & Petkova, E. (2013). Cluster (school) RCT of ParentCorps: Impact on kindergarten academic achievement. Pediatrics, 131(5), 1521–1529. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-2632

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a ParentCorps on children’s kindergarten academic achievement. Schools were matched on size and split into pairs. Within each pair, one school was randomly assigned to intervention (ParentCorps) and the other to control. Measures utilized the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (KTEA) Brief Form, Second Edition, and the Speed Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning (DIAL). Results indicate relative to children in control schools, children in intervention schools had higher kindergarten achievement test scores and higher teacher rated academic performance. Limitations include the number of randomization units (schools) was small, increasing the potential for Type 1 error, reliance on self-reported measures and lack of follow-up. Note: This study was not used to rate ParentCorps in the Mental Health Prevention/Early Intervention (Child & Adolescent) Programs topic area since the outcomes did not fit the topic area.

Additional References

Dawson-McClure S., Calzada E., & Brotman L. (2017) Engaging parents in preventive interventions for young children: Working with cultural diversity within low-income, urban neighborhoods. Prevention Science, 18(6), 660–670. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0763-7

Dawson-McClure, S., Calzada, E., Hamer, K., Kolawole, B., Mondesir, M., Rhule, D., Rosenblatt, K., & Brotman, L. (in press). Understanding ParentCorps’ essential elements for building adult capacity to support young children’s health and development. In K. Bierman & S. Sheridan (Eds.), Research on family-school partnerships: An interdisciplinary examination of state of the science and critical needs (Volume V: Family-school partnerships during the early school years - advancing science to influence practice).

Contact Information

Spring Dawson-McClure
Website: med.nyu.edu/departments-institutes/population-health/divisions-sections-centers/health-behavior/center-early-childhood-health-development/parentcorps
Email:

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: July 2020

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: October 2020

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: October 2020