Family Map Inventories

Assessment Rating:
A
A – Psychometrics Well-Demonstrated
See entire scale
Developer(s):

Dr. Leanne Whiteside- Mansell, Ed.D – Professor

Description / Purpose:

The child’s home and parenting environment is assessed and linked to resource options. The areas assessed have been identified as those that most impact child development (e.g., adequate food, family conflict, stimulation, physical safety and emotional support).

This tool has a brief depression screen and brief alcohol and other drug use screen. Additionally, it has shown be a valid screen for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) in young children.

Target Population: Families with children from birth to 5 years of age with a risk of adverse childhood experiences or prenatal women living in poverty

Time to Administer: Assessment interview that lasts 30-45 minutes followed by frequent (at least quarterly) contact with the family and reassessment every 6 months or a year

Completed By: Early Childhood professionals & caregiver of target child

Modalities Available: Computerized, Pen and Paper, and online

Scoring Information: Practitioners can use the shaded areas to identify strengths and risks in the child’s family to guide their family engagement and resources referrals.

Languages Available: English, Spanish

Training Requirements for Intended Users: Providers/agencies using the Family Map Inventories must: Attend a 6-hour training Follow a detailed manual describing implementation, links to child development, guidance on actions, and relevant research summarized Adopt the use of the Inventories systematically (usually agency wide) Use the structured and uniquely formatted interview tools to maximize communication and assessment Use the Inventories in one-on-one interviews with the primary caregiver Score Inventories during the interview to improve the services for individual families; they can be scored electronically also for use by agencies to evaluate program impact Establish and maintain regular contact with families at home visits, parent teacher conferences, or other face-to-face meetings

Availability: Attendance at a 6-hour Family Map Inventories Training is required to obtain a copy of the tool. Training is available onsite or at the Little Rock office. Price for the use of the Family Map Inventories is based on size of program.

Contact Information

Company: Children and Family Evaluation Services DBA The Family Map
Website: www.thefamilymap.org
Name: Danielle Thomas
Email:
Phone: (501) 944-6011

Summary of Relevant Psychometric Research

This tool has received the Measurement Tools Rating of "A – Psychometrics Well-Demonstrated" based on the published, peer-reviewed research available. The tool must have 2 or more published, peer-reviewed studies that have established the measure’s psychometrics (e.g., reliability and validity, sensitivity and specificity, etc.). Please see the Measurement Tools Rating Scale for more information.

Show relevant research...

Whiteside-Mansell, L., Bradley, R.H., Conners, N. A., & Bokony, P. A. (2007). The Family Map: Structured interview to identify risks and strengths in head start families. NHSA Dialog: A Research-to-Practice Journal for the Early Intervention Field, 10, 189-209.

Sample:

Participants — Participants were parents and teachers at 20 Head Start Centers in an urban area (N=53 classrooms) and in 6 Centers (N=17) serving a more rural area.

Race/Ethnicity — Families in urban Centers: 69% Black, 9% White, 16% Hispanic, and 6% Other; Families in rural Centers: 14% Black, 48% White, 31% Hispanic, and 7% Other

Summary:

This paper describes the development of the Family Map Inventory [now called Family Map Inventories], a semi-structured interview developed to assess important aspects of the family and home environment associated with well-being in 3- to 5-year old children and designed to be used during home visits with Head Start families. Test-retest reliability was examined by comparing the responses of the subset of parents (N=19) interviewed by both teachers and data collectors and found to be adequate on most indicators. Data from the Family Map Inventory on risk factors was also compared to available national estimates and found to be largely consistent.

Whiteside-Mansell, L., Johnson, D., Aitken, M. E., Bokony, P. A., Conners-Burrow, N. A , & McKelvey, L. (2010). Head Start and unintended injury: The use of the Family Map Interview to document risk. Early Childhood Education Journal, 38(1), 33-41. doi:10.1007/s10643-010-0380-6

Sample:

Participants — Participants were parents and children involved in a Head Start Program.

Race/Ethnicity — Child: 46% African American, 27% White, 22% Hispanic/Latino, 3% Biracial/Multiracial, and 2% Other

Summary:

This study examined two large Head Start programs that adopted an interview assessment tool called the Family Map (FM) [now called Family Map Inventories] for use during the home visit.

Swindle, T. Whiteside-Mansell, L., & McKelvey, L. (2012). Food Insecurity: Validation of a two-item screen using convergent risks. Journal of Child and Family Studies. 22(7), 932-941. doi:10.1007/s10826-012-9652-7

Sample:

Participants — Parents with children enrolled in agencies serving families eligible for Head Start (HS).

Race/Ethnicity — Child: 54.7% African American, 20.7% Hispanic/Latino, 18.9% White, 5.8% Other; Parents: Not specified

Summary:

The purpose of the present study is to provide validity for the use of a 2-item screen, the Family Map Inventory [now called Family Map Inventories] for food insecurity that can be integrated into early childcare settings such as Head Start.

Whiteside-Mansell, L., Johnson, D., Bokony, P., McKelvey, L., Burrow, N., & Swindle, T. (2013). Supporting family engagement with parents of infants and toddlers. NHSA Dialog, 16(1), 20-44.

Sample:

Participants — Participants were teachers at 3 rural Head Start Centers (N=50).

Race/Ethnicity — Not specified

Summary:

This study reports on the development of the Family Map Inventory of the Parenting Environment of Infants and Toddlers (IT-FM) [now called Family Map Inventories] by summarizing the development process and the implementation of the IT-FM in a rural Early Head Start (EHS) program. Reliability and validity was examined by questions and risk indicators as used by teachers. EHS teachers (n = 10) and administrators (n = 5) reviewed the pilot tool and suggested modifications. Internal consistency estimates (Cronbach’s alpha) were computed for seven sets of questions. These were supportive of adequate reliability with values generally high. Data from the Family Map Inventory on risk factors was also compared to available national estimates and found to be largely consistent. Independent assessments were also conducted to evaluate validity of some constructs.

Bokony, P. A., Whiteside-Mansell, L., Swindle, T., & Waliski, A. D. (2013 Increasing parent-teacher communication in private preschools serving low-income families. NHSA Dialog, 16(1), 45-64.

Sample:

Participants — Participants were from 11 intervention centers with 27 classrooms and 7 comparison centers with 18 classrooms.

Race/Ethnicity — Teacher intervention: 62% Black, 34% White, and 4% Other; Teacher comparison: 75% Black and 25% White; Child intervention: 54.1% African American, 36.0% White, 5.2% Hispanic, and 4.7% Other; Child Comparison: 60.8% African American, 33.3% White, 3.9% Hisp

Summary:

This paper tested the impact of a two-pronged intervention, the Family Map Inventory for Early Childhood (Family Map; family assessment) [now called Family Map Inventories] and Teaching Important Parenting Skills (TIPS; brief parenting interventions on broad array of topics), on parent-teacher communication in private childcare centers serving low-income families.

Ward, W. L., Swindle, T., Kyzer, A., & Whiteside-Mansell, L. (2014). Low fruit/vegetable consumption in the home: Cumulative risk factors in early childhood. Early Childhood Education Journal, 43, 417-425. doi:10.1007/s10643-014-0661-6

Sample:

Participants — Participants were teachers at 27 Head Start centers and 1,035 caregivers at these Head Start Centers.

Race/Ethnicity — Child: 55% African American, 20.4% Hispanic/Latino, 19.1% White, and 5.5% Other; Teachers: Not specified; Caregivers: Not specified

Summary:

This study uses a cumulative risk theory framework identified by the Family Map Inventory [now called Family Map Inventories] to investigate factors related to fruits and vegetable consumption in a large sample of preschool youth from low-income families

Swindle, T., Ward, W. L., Whiteside-Mansell, L., Brathwaite, J., Bokony, P.A., Conners-Burrow, N., & McKelvey, L. M. (2014). Pediatric nutrition: Parenting impacts beyond financial resources. Clinical Pediatrics, 53, 793-795. doi:10.1177/0009922813505904

Sample:

Participants — Participants were parents with children enrolled in agencies serving families eligible for Head Start (HS).

Race/Ethnicity — Child: 74.4% African American, Parents: Not specified

Summary:

This study utilizes the Family Map Inventory [now called Family Map Inventories] to explore the importance of parenting characteristics in predicting child fruit and vegetable consumption in light of financial barriers to provide a clearer understanding of the factors that contribute to a low-quality diet.

Kyzer, A., Whiteside-Mansell, L., McKelvey, L., & Swindle, T. (2016). Supporting family engagement in home visiting with the Family Map Inventories. Infants and Young Children, 29(1), 37-52. doi:10.1097/IYC.0000000000000051

Sample:

Participants — Participants were 39 Home visiting coordinators and 70 families who enrolled in a Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) program.

Race/Ethnicity — Not specified

Summary:

The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a universal screening tool, the Family Map Inventory (FMI) [now called Family Map Inventories], to assess family strengths and needs in a home visiting program.

McKelvey, L., Whiteside-Mansell, L., Conners-Burrow, N., Swindle, T., & Fitzgerald, S. (2016). Assessing adverse experiences from infancy through early childhood in home visiting programs. Child Abuse & Neglect, 51, 295-302.

Sample:

Participants — Participants were 1,282 families who enrolled in Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program.

Race/Ethnicity — 60% White, 22% African-American, and 16% Hispanic

Summary:

The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of a modified version of a universal screening tool, used a modified version of the Family Map Inventories, called the FMI-ACE, to develop an assessment of children’s exposure to ACEs and to examine concurrently measured parental child abuse and neglect potential and child social–emotional functioning.

Date Reviewed: September 2017 (Originally reviewed in September 2017)