PRIDE Model of Practice (Parent Resource for Information, Development, and Education)

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Scientific Rating:
NR
Not able to be Rated
See scale of 1-5
Child Welfare System Relevance Level:
High
See descriptions of 3 levels

About This Program

The information in this program outline is provided by the program representative and edited by the CEBC staff. PRIDE Model of Practice (Parent Resource for Information, Development, and Education) has been reviewed by the CEBC in the areas of: Placement Stabilization Programs and Resource Parent Recruitment and Training Programs, but lacks the necessary research evidence to be given a Scientific Rating.

Target Population: Prospective foster and adoptive parents and experienced foster parents; child welfare professionals who develop, support, and team with resource parents

For parents/caregivers of children ages: 0 – 21

Brief Description

PRIDE Model of Practice (Parent Resource for Information, Development, and Education) is a competency-based model of practice designed to strengthen the quality of family foster care and adoption services by developing and supporting foster and adoptive families who are willing, able, and have the resources to meet the needs of traumatized children and their families. A model of practice means that all staff and foster/adoptive parents who work with at-risk children and their birth families share the same vision, mission, goals, values; use the same strengths-based child and family-friendly words; demonstrate the same standard of child welfare work practices; and share accountability for outcomes. The PRIDE Model of Practice is based on five essential competency categories for foster/adoptive parents, developed from a comprehensive national analysis of the roles of foster and adoptive parents and grouped into the following five categories: (1) Protecting and nurturing children (safety child welfare outcome); (2) Meeting children’s developmental needs and addressing developmental delays (well-being child welfare outcome); (3) Supporting relationships between children and their families (permanency child welfare outcome); (4) Connecting children to safe, nurturing relationships intended to last a lifetime (permanency child welfare outcome); and (5) Working as a member of a professional team (essential to achieve the above four categories). CWLA (Child Welfare League of America) is proud to offer the PRIDE Model of Practice to help public and private child welfare agencies recruit, develop, assess, support, train, and retain resource families to be team members in achieving Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) outcomes.

Program Goals:

The overall goals of the PRIDE Model of Practice (Parent Resource for Information, Development, and Education) are:

  • Meet the protective, developmental, cultural, and permanency needs of children placed with foster and adoptive families, with an emphasis on trauma-informed practices
  • Strengthen families (birth, blended, foster, and adoptive)
  • Strengthen the quality of family foster care and adoption services by providing a standardized, structured model of practice for:
    • The recruitment, mutual assessment, pre-service training, and selection of foster and adoptive parents
    • Foster parent in-service training
    • Ongoing professional development
  • Share resources among public and voluntary child welfare agencies, colleges and universities, foster and adoptive parent associations, and national child welfare organizations

Contact Information

Name: Donna D. Petras, PhD, MSW
Title: CWLA Director Models of Practice and Training
Agency/Affiliation: Child Welfare League of America
Website: www.cwla.org/pride-training
Email:
Phone: (202) 590-8746

Date Research Evidence Last Reviewed by CEBC: February 2015

Date Program Content Last Reviewed by Program Staff: May 2014

Date Program Originally Loaded onto CEBC: May 2007